| Cult of Mac

Kickstarter project puts cameras in the hands of London’s homeless

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The cover of the 2016 calendar called My London photographed by homeless artists.
The cover of the 2016 calendar called My London photographed by homeless artists.
Photo: ROL

David Tovey became homeless on the streets of London after a stroke and found salvation in an unlikely place – a disposable camera.

Tovey was invited to participate in an art project giving Londoners cameras to record life on the streets for a calendar now being sold on Kickstarter. He has had photos selected for the Cafe Art calendar project two years in a row.

Teen’s iPhone photos put vibrant face on homeless population

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The teen iPhoneographer is taking photos of the city's homeless population.

"I met a lady and her children who travel to heavily populated areas of St. Louis to play music for tips to buy food each night. The children's broken bikes and few cherished possesions carefully tucked in the run down van they call "home," Tullis says.

Nic Tullis has a summer project that doesn’t involve surfing or working at a frozen-yogurt shop.

The 18-year-old is at the tail end of a Kickstarter campaign to to raise $2,500 that will keep him out photographing with his iPhone 4s. His “Homeless But Not Hopeless” project aims to bring awareness about the homeless population of St. Louis, Missouri, which spiked 12 percent after the economic tsunami hit.

Tullis takes photos of homeless people that show how they live along with normal shots that show off St. Louis. The funding for the project would rent a gallery space to auction off prints as a fundraiser; proceeds would go to two local organizations that help people get back on their feet.