Today in Apple history: Flash controversy results in banned iPhone ad

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First gen iPhone
The internet wasn't quite so seamless on the first-gen iPhone.
Photo: Traci Dauphin/Cult of Mac

August 27: Today in Apple history: Flash controversy results in banned iPhone ad August 27, 2008: The U.K. bans an iPhone ad for apparently misleading consumers.

The misleading bit? The ad overhypes the iPhone’s internet-surfing abilities. It does this by not mentioning that the device doesn’t support Adobe Flash — which is vital to internet surfing in 2008. How times change, eh?

Samsung unleashes world’s largest SSD with 30TB of storage

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Samsung SSD
That's enough storage for 500 days of HD video.
Photo: Samsung

Samsung is again responsible for the world’s largest solid-state drive.

Almost years after the South Korean company released its record-breaking 15.36TB drive, it has unleashed a 30.72TB model. It is the most storage ever squeezed into a 2.5-inch form factor, enough to hold 5,700 high-definition movies.

Google Chrome will swap Flash for HTML5 this fall

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Chrome won't sap battery life like it used to.
Slowly but surely Flash is dying.
Photo: Apple

Google is finally stepping up its bid to kill Flash content. Later this year, its Chrome browser will default to HTML5 wherever possible, using Flash only as a last resort.

The move should make Chrome speedier and more stable — and better on battery life when used on a MacBook.

Adobe rushes out yet another security patch for Flash

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Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more.
Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more.
Photo: Adobe

In a post that surprises no one in the tech community, Adobe needed to fix another Flash security flaw today, rushing out a patch for its web multimedia software.

Adobe is rating the update as a critical vulnerability “that could potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.”

Which, of course, sounds like kind of a big deal. Time for yet another security patch for Flash.

Master the worlds of Adobe and web design with a lifetime of lessons [Deals]

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dcee8de2cc702eca683f54c4374e470e5176f8c2_main_hero_image

From Photoshop to Flash, Adobe’s software products are a key part of the digital media ecosystem. Mastering a set of tools as wide ranging as theirs takes a lot of time, which is exactly what the Lifetime Subscription to Adobe Training Videos offers. For $89, you’ll get literally as much time as you need to absorb thousands of lessons on the countless facets of Adobe and web design.

Twitch jumps on the Flash-dumping bandwagon

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HTML5 is winning, thank goodness.
HTML5 is winning, thank goodness.
Photo: Twitch

Video game streaming juggernaut Twitch.tv is stepping up its HTML5 game today with a move to get rid of buggy and overly-patched Flash in Twitch’s website.

The move today is only for the player part of the equation, but a full HTML5 solution should be forthcoming.

“Today’s redesign moves half of the video player – specifically the controls – from Flash to HTML5 and Javascript,” Twitch writes on its blog page. “The video itself is still in Flash underneath the controls. However, this is an important step to releasing the much-anticipated full HTML5 player.”

Facebook security chief begs Adobe to kill Flash

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html5-book
The battle continues to put Flash to death in favor of HTML5.
Photo: Jeremy Keith/Flickr CC

Though Adobe Flash has been dying a slow death over the past few years, it’s far from dead yet. However, it seems like some people are getting pretty impatient with it and Facebook’s new chief security officer Alex Stamos is one of those people. He publicly tweeted yesterday calling out Adobe to just set a date already to kill Flash and make an announcement to put an end to its misery.