‘Romeo and Juliet’ to blame for iPhone X’s latest production woes

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Juliet
Romeo and Juliet sensor components are to blame.
Photo: 20th Century Fox

The TrueDepth facial recognition 3D sensor is reportedly the latest manufacturing bottleneck when it comes to the iPhone X, and is causing Apple’s suppliers to turn out just “tens of thousands” of finished handsets per day — against possible preorders of 40-50 million.

A new report sheds a bit more light on the exact problem being faced by Apple’s suppliers. Apparently, it relates to a pair of components dubbed Romeo and Juliet, which make up the sensor in question.

Face ID sensor is latest pain point for iPhone X production

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Face ID
iPhone X production is no walk in the park for Apple.
Photo: Apple

If you wonder why you can’t get your hands on an iPhone X until well into 2018, you may have its facial recognition 3D sensor to blame, a new report claims.

Citing two executives working for iPhone X suppliers, the report states that the new sensor’s yield rate is failing to reach a satisfactory level. As a result, just “tens of thousands” of iPhone X handsets are currently being produced daily. For a handset that could have preorders of 40-50 million that’s not good!

Apple suppliers confirm two of iPhone 8’s biggest features

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iPhone 8 facial recognition
We could be waiting a long time for iPhone 8.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple supplier Largan says it will ship its new 3D sensors in time for iPhone 8, while another supply chain vendor confirms waterproof wireless charging technology.

Largan’s sensors are capable of carrying out facial and iris recognition and provide an alternative to fingerprint scanning. They could be the solution Apple turns to if it is unable to embed a Touch ID scanner beneath the iPhone 8’s display.

Flip off meter maids with AwareCar, an app for better parking

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It's just the size of a quarter, but this $9 dongle can supercharge your parking.
It's just the size of a quarter, but this $9 dongle can supercharge your parking.
Photo: Aware Stack

If you have trouble finding your car in a busy garage, or always find yourself coming back to a lapsed parking meter and a ticket stuck under your windshield wiper, you’re in luck. A new Bluetooth sensor, in combination with an iPhone app, can make losing your car and racking up fines a thing of the past.

The future of video chat is totally touchy-feely

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Haptic feedback is a major component in this new technology invented at the University of Tokyo.
Photo: Shinoda Lab

HaptoClone is a new creation from researchers in the Shinoda Lab at the University of Tokyo that can let you practically feel what isn’t actually in front of you. It at least gives you the illusion that you’re feeling it. The technology is trippy in theory, but in practice it very well may lead to a more personal level of communication through our smartphones and computers – or dare I say more intimate.

Surprise! This year’s iPads all likely to have Touch ID

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Apple wants to design its own Touch ID and display chips.
Image courtesy of iFixit.
Photo: iFixit

When the iPhone 5s was announced as featuring Touch ID, you could have been forgiven for assuming that the iPad Air and iPad mini would naturally follow suit. Like original thinking from Samsung, however, it never quite materialized — and to this date Apple’s flagship iPhone is the only Apple device to incorporate the technology.

That may be set to change with the arrival of the next generation iPad Air and iPad mini, though.

Get ready to run: The first of Wahoo’s next-gen Bluetooth heart-rate sensors is here

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Wahoo’s first heart-rate sensor was of the pedestrian ANT+ variety, and connected to the iPhone through a 30-pin ANT+ dongle. Around a year later, the Atlanta-based outfit introduced the first heart-rate sensor that connected to a smartphone through Bluetooth; specifically and only to the iPhone 4s, since that was the only phone at the time with Bluetooth 4.0 under the hood.

Wahoo upped the ante again in January at CES, when they revealed a radical departure from traditional heart-rate based fitness tracking: Their new highly sophisticated, three-model TICKR sensor squad, combined with an all-new app that turns conventional fitness-tracking on its head. Now the first of the TICKR trio, the TICKR Run, is hitting the street.