Purported iPad 5 Gets Pictured With A Touch ID Sensor

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Touch ID has received all kinds of praise since it made its debut on the iPhone 5s last month, so naturally, the question everyone’s asking is whether the new fingerprint-scanning technology will make its way to other iOS devices.

We’ve already seen evidence that suggests it will come to the second-generation iPad mini, and the blurry picture above seems to prove that Touch ID is also coming to the fifth-generation iPad, alongside its all-new design.

Introducing The World’s First Wearable And Programmable Sensing Computer [Deals]

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The Swiss Army knife is one of the best creations ever. You have so many tools at your disposal with it that it makes a lot of sense to have one handy. Now Cult of Mac Deals is offering you what could be considered a digital Swiss Army knife of sorts in the Sensordrone.

Sporting 11 sensors for your smartphone, the Sensordrone fits right on your key chain and has tons of applications that can be used anytime and anywhere. Whether you want to administer your own breathalyzer, check for gas leaks, or get incredibly local weather information, the Sensordrone has you covered. And you can get the Sensordrone for just $149 during this limited time offer.

iPhone 5S To Get Sapphire Crystal Home Button With Fingerprint Sensor [Rumor]

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The iPhone 5S could come with a sapphire crystal capacitive touch home button that incorporates a new fingerprint sensor, according to supply chain sources in Taiwan.

Apple is expected to do away with the traditional physical home button, which has long been one of the most unreliable components on iOS devices. It’s thought that using sapphire crystal, which has a hardness second only to diamond, will prevent the button from getting scratched and ruining the fingerprint sensor.

Hey, Chillax! HeartMath Wants To Help You Fight Anxiety With Your iDevice

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It’s taken three years, but HeartMath has finally responded, in the form of a major redesign, to the concerns we (and probably other critics) voiced over their original emWave stress-management gadget.

Where the emWave required plugging in to a USB port and cost $300, their new Inner Balance system works with pretty much any 30-pin iDevice and sells for just $99.

Netgear VueZone Wireless Video Monitoring System: Super-Easy, But Low on Frills [Review]

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As video surveillance goes, Netgear’s VueZone system is about as easy and user-friendly as it gets. But does VueZone sacrifice power and performance for ease-of-use? We tested the two-camera system, which cam with two motion-detecting cameras, four magnetic mounts and the master gateway for $290. It also came with a one-month trial subscription to the Premier service subscription; the no-frills Basic service, which allows you to montitor up to two cameras remotely from your computer, is free.

Outdoor Research Sensor Gloves Work Like Magic, Mostly [Review]

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I have a complicated relationship with gloves. On the one hand, I love that they keep my fingers from falling off in frigid weather. But then there’s the frustration at their complete lack of cooperation when I’m trying to use the touchscreen on my phone. As a result, I end up either constantly removing and re-donning my gloves in an endless cycle that freezes my delicate fingers anyway — or abandoning my phone altogether in disgust.

The problem is that most touchscreens rely on our fingers to act as conductors, and conventional gloves block that conductivity. But glove-makers have rolled with the times, and there are solutions — gloves that allow conductivity to pass through the glove’s fabric and onto the screen. One of the most buzzed about is Outdoor Research’s Sensor Gloves ($69), which use real leather that doesn’t appear or feel any different than leather used in non-conductive gloves.

The LUMOback Sensor Can Help You Improve Your Posture [Macworld 2013]

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Keeping your posture in check likely isn’t something you often think about on a daily basis. With so many things going on everyday, you may not realize just how bad your posture is, though. That’s where the LUMOback sensor comes in.

The LUMOback is essentially a belt that you wear which detects exactly how you sit and stand throughout the day, and records the data to a companion iOS app. In addition, the sensor will vibrate to tell you if you’ve been sitting or standing poorly for too long.