How to search Google like a boss

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Google search operators
Search like a pro with Google search operators.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

For many folks, Google is the front page of the internet. You don’t type Facebook.com into your browser. You just type “Facebook,” and then click the first Google result. Or you do a basic search by tapping in what you’re looking for.

But Google is way more powerful than that. You just have to learn a few of its secret code words, and then you can slice and dice your searches like a pro. No more wading through pages of results to find what you want. Use these tricks, and you’ll almost always get what you want on the first page. You can even ask Google to show you the weather.

DuckDuckGo gives Apple Maps a tiny victory over Google

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DuckDuckGo searches can now include Apple Maps data without violating your privacy.
DuckDuckGo searches can now include Apple Maps data without violating your privacy.
Photo: DuckDuckGo

DuckDuckGo teamed up with Apple to  protect user privacy for map and address-related searches. Their agreement gives users of the search engine access to continually updated maps, enhanced satellite imagery and more without exposing their data.

The pairing seems natural as both Apple and DuckDuckGo have taken strong stances on protecting user privacy.

How to use Quick Website Search in Safari for iOS

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This gentleman staring into a light represents the illumination of search.
This gentleman staring into a light represents the illumination of search.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

Safari for iOS has a great feature: Quick Website Search. This lets you search the contents of a single website, using that site’s own built-in search. The clever part is that you don’t have to visit the site and tap into its search bar. Once Safari learns how to search that site, you can search it right from Safari’s own search bar.

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Long known for its anonymous search prowess, DuckDuckGo is going long on online privacy.
Long known for its anonymous search prowess, DuckDuckGo is going long on privacy.
Photo: Kaique Rocha/Pexels CC

Apple distances itself from Google even more in iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite

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The new Spotlight search in Yosemite (photo: Roberto Baldwin/ The Next Web)
The new Spotlight search in Yosemite (photo: Roberto Baldwin/ The Next Web)

Apple and Google aren’t the good friends they used to be thanks to the rise of Android as the iPhone’s main competitor. Ever since Apple axed Google Maps in iOS 6, it has been clear that Google’s days in Apple’s software are numbered.

The hardest Google service for Apple to replace is undoubtedly search. Siri is slowly becoming its own search engine of sorts that draws from multiple services like Wolfram Alpha and Wikipedia, but Google has remained the standard for traditional web search.

In iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite, Google is still set as Safari’s default search engine. But with the introduction of more search partners in Apple’s new software, it’s hard to believe that Google search will enjoy its prominence for much longer.

5 incredible iOS 8 features Apple didn’t mention

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Roberto Baldwin/The Next Web
Roberto Baldwin/The Next Web

Apple added a ton of new features to iOS 8 today and more are surely on the way once new iPhones and iPads are announced. But while Photos, Messaging and Notification Center stole most of the spotlight during the WWDC keynote, there were a bunch of smaller features Apple didn’t cover.

Better camera tools, battery statistics, new Siri tricks and more were also added to today’s beta. Here’s our hands-on preview of five incredible features Apple didn’t mention in today’s keynote.