Indie browser Opera runs twice as fast on M1 Macs

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Opera browser
Opera has been available on the Mac since the mid-1990s.
Photo: Opera

The indie Opera browser, one of the oldest browsers still operating today, has been updated with native support for Apple Silicon Macs. The update means that the Opera browser now runs 2x faster on M1 Macs.

Opera first debuted on Mac way back in 1996. That’s approaching a decade before Safari made its debut. One of Opera’s first big claims to fame was that it made it easier to browse several web pages at once. Today, its big appeal is its minimalist aesthetic, innovative sidebar design, and (now faster than ever) performance.

Apple reportedly pushes back production of redesigned MacBook Pro

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13-inch MacBook Pro with M1 boasts amazing speed and battery life.
MacBook Pro is reported to get a big redesign this year.
Screenshot: Apple

Apple delayed plans to start mass-producing its next-gen MacBook Pro until this fall, according to a new report from Nikkei Asia. Originally, Cupertino was expected to start building the new laptops in May or June.

This MacBook Pro is widely expected to boast a new form factor and come in both 14- and 16-inch screen sizes. It is also anticipated to kill off the LED Touch Bar in favor of a row of physical keys, bring back the MagSafe charger, feature a built-in SD card reader and HDMI port, and sport a fancy mini-LED display.

In other words, it sounds like it’ll be worth the wait. But you will likely be waiting.

Apple invests $1 billion in next-generation chip design center

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Apple engineers
The next generation of Apple chips incoming.
Photo: Apple

Apple is investing upward of 1 billion euros ($1.19 billion) in building a European Center for Chip Design in Munich, Germany. This will be used, in Apple’s (translated) words, for developing processes involving “5G and the wireless technologies of the future.”

Munich is already the location of Apple’s biggest development center in Europe. It is home to close to 1,500 engineers from 40 countries. The new initiative will see them joined by hundreds more employees.

Good riddance to iMac Pro and the era of underwhelming Macs

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The 27-inch iMac Pro.
The iMac Pro never seemed to find an audience.
Photo: Apple

The iMac Pro is seemingly nearing the end of its natural lifespan — and good riddance to it.

In fairness, the iMac Pro was not a bad computer. It was even, technically, a pretty great one. But it epitomized an era of Mac design that may have been the most uninspired and directionless in Apple history.

Apple sends out $500 digital vouchers to devs who return their DTK Macs

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Mac mini with ARM chip
DTK Mac was a preview of Apple Silicon.
Photo: Apple

Apple started issuing $500 digital vouchers to developers following the return of their Developer Transition Kit Macs.

The company introduced the custom DTK Macs last year at its Worldwide Developers Conference. As their name suggests, the hardware was intended to help developers transition their apps from Macs’ previous Intel architecture to new Apple Silicon processors.

They were offered as a one-year lease, although Apple wound up requesting them back at around the nine-month mark.

iMac 4K production slows as Apple Silicon upgrade looms

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This iMac concept reflects what a lot of people want.
It could (we hope) look a lot like this.
Concept: Daniel Bautista

Apple has reportedly slowed production of the 21.5-inch iMac ahead of a much-anticipated Apple Silicon upgrade. The company’s popular all-in-one is expected to make the shift to custom ARM chips this year.

In the meantime, certain 21.5-inch iMac 4K models powered by Intel processors could be a little more difficult to get hold of.

Apple steps up fight against Silver Sparrow malware that targets M1 Macs

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Apple Silicon
Apple Silicon Macs aren't safe from malware.
Photo: Apple

The first wave of malware written specifically for Apple Silicon Macs is starting to appear. And Apple’s already playing Whac-A-Mole to try and stop it.

The malware in question, called “Silver Sparrow,” is reportedly a malicious package that can exploit a vulnerability in the macOS Installer JavaScript API as a way to execute dodgy commands. While it remains unclear how big of a threat Silver Sparrow poses, Apple nonetheless took steps to stop its spread.