Apple Music will get a major facelift at WWDC

If your iPhone-toting friend or relative hasn't tried Apple Music yet, set 'em up.
Apple Music is getting a major update in June.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

With 13 million subscribers, Apple Music is pretty far from being a failure. At the same time, it’s fair to say that the service probably hasn’t been met with the rapturous applause which greeted, say, the launch of the iTunes Store back in 2003.

That’s about to change at WWDC, however, with Apple rumored to be using the developer conference to unleash “sweeping changes” to its streaming music service.

Apple officially makes one of Steve Jobs’ favorite projects obsolete

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WebObjects came to Apple when Steve Jobs returned from NeXT.
Photo: Ben Stanfield/Flickr CC

Twenty years after it was first released to the public, Apple has finally confirmed that its WebObjects Java-based web application framework is dead — at least as far as official Apple updates are concerned.

Never heard of WebObjects? You’re probably not alone, but back in the 1990s it was considered a breakthrough product, was one that Steve Jobs was incredibly high on, and officially came over to Apple as part of the historic deal to acquire Jobs’ former company NeXT. Even today, aspects of WebObjects are used to power its online Apple Store and iTunes Store.

Moog’s new iPad synth app is a knob-twiddler’s dream

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It's the 1970s all over again!
Photo: Moog

If you’re a fan of classic synth music (and, let’s be honest, who isn’t?), you may want to check out Moog’s latest iOS release, which astonishingly recreates the company’s iconic 1973 Model 15 modular synth inside an iPad app.

Considering that a genuine Model 15 will set you back $10,000, and Moog’s app is just $30, that’s a whopping $9,970 discount!

Facebook coughs up $10,000 for 10-year-old Instagram hacker

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It pays to uncover Facebook flaws.
Photo: Killian Bell/Cult of Mac

A 10-year-old with insane hacking skills just scored a $10,000 payout from Facebook for uncovering a serious flaw in Instagram.

The Helsinki-based boy, who can’t even open a Facebook account for another three years, found he was able to alter code on Instagram’s servers to delete comments posted by any account.

People can’t stop running into Google’s autonomous cars

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Yep. This is a form that exists now.
Photo: Department of Motor Vehicles

Google’s autonomous cars have taken to the road with the rest of us normals in our comparatively Flintstones-esque, human-directed rides. And the very small brush-ups are starting to come in.

In fact, the California DMV has created a form just for reporting accidents involving at least one self-driving vehicle, and it publishes these reports on its website. And while the doomsayers and doubters have wrung their hands about cars plowing into trucks filled with baby penguins, the truth is that the dozen or so accidents on the list are so hilariously small that they hardly seem worth the paperwork at all.

They should definitely file the reports; don’t get us wrong. But we imagine an eye-roll or two while it happens.

Hacking for the good guys is a lucrative skill to learn [Deals]

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With companies like Instagram paying big bug bounties, it's a great time to learn ethical hacking.
Photo: Cult of Mac Deals

Finding faults in a computer system can mean exploiting it — which is what we’ve been conditioned to think of when we hear the term “hacker” — or it can mean you’re trying to find ways of making the system stronger.

That’s what so-called white hat hacking is all about, and it’s a skill that’s becoming increasingly lucrative as more and more businesses are looking to do business over secure networks. This Ethical Hacker and Pentester Pro Bundle is a great way to join the light side of the hacking workforce, and you can get it for whatever you’re willing to pay.