Google will fix iPhone ‘bug’ that allows unlimited photo storage

By

iPhone-11-Pro-camera
Google won't let original photos go free.
Photo: Apple

Google has confirmed it plans to fix a “bug” that gives iPhone owners unlimited high-resolution photo storage.

Some users believed the issue was actually a feature that could save Google “millions of dollars” in cloud storage. But Google has says it is unintended and it is working on a fix.

Google adds enhanced privacy tools to Maps and YouTube

By

Google Maps and YouTube privacy tools
It's getting easier to not be tracked in Maps. And YouTube is getting a timed history auto-delete.
Photo: Google

Google just promised that Incognito mode will soon be added to Maps. And YouTube is getting timed auto-delete for the user’s video history. In addition, a new Password Checkup tool helps users avoid common passcodes.

This advertising company has been making similar changes to its other services in hopes of shaking a reputation for privacy invasion.

Today in Apple history: Google comes out of beta

By

Google Apple
Google and Apple were friends at first. It didn't last.
Photo: Google/Apple

September 21: Today in Apple history: Google comes out of beta September 21, 1999: A little startup called Google comes out of beta, with the launch of a website that will let the general public easily search the internet for information.

To Apple, which is embracing the internet with its twin iMac G3 and iBook products, Google seems like the perfect ally. Sadly, the relationship doesn’t remain rosy for long.

Facebook eyes 2023 launch for smart glasses project

By

Facebook messaging apps
Zuckerberg has reportedly asked that the project be made a priority.
Photo: Facebook

Apple’s long-rumored AR glasses project could get some competition from the world’s biggest social network company.

Facebook is reportedly developing its own augmented reality glasses. The social network recently struck a partnership with Ray-Ban parent company Luxottica to speed the product along, according to a new report.

Google agrees to pay France $1.1 billion to end tax investigation

By

A group called Google You Owe Us wants $1000 each after Google invaded their privacy
Google is the latest tech giant to be fined in France.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

Google will pay a total of $1.1 billion to end a four-year probe into its tax activities in France. This is a combination of fine and repayment of additional taxes Google didn’t pay first time around.

France and Germany have both pushed for tighter tax regulations of multination tech giants. Others — Apple included — have been charged in the past. They may have to stump up more cash in the future, too.

Apple claps back at Google’s claims of iPhone vulnerabilities

By

security lock safe
Surprise, surprise, your iPhone isn’t as vulnerable to being hacked as Apple’s chief rival says it is.
Photo: Pexels

The accusations Google recently made about iOS security flaws were greatly overstated, deliberately “stoking fear” in iPhone users, according to Apple. The iPhone maker points out that the issues were much more narrow than its rival indicated, and were online for only a brief time.

State antitrust probes of Google and Facebook don’t include Apple… yet

By

Millions of iPhone users in the U.K. are suing Google for illicit data collection
States have launched investigations into Facebook and Google but not Apple.
Photo: rawpixel.com/Pexels CC

Separate groups of US state attorneys general are investigating Facebook and Google for antitrust violations. So far, there has been no word of AGs probing Apple.

However, that doesn’t mean the iPhone maker has escaped probes by other government bodies, both in the US and Europe.

US orders Apple to identify users of rifle scope app

By

random riflescope
Justice officials have their sights set on a lot of private data.
Photo: Captaindan/Wikimedia CC

The Department of Justice has ordered Apple and Google to turn over names, phone numbers and IP addresses for users of a gun scope app that allows gun owners to calibrate scopes and capture video.

Data privacy activists say the government’s ask would set a “dangerous precedent,” giving officials access to data on thousands of innocent people.