Today in Apple history: NeXT customers get early taste of OS X

By

NeXTstep
NeXTSTEP was an operating system ahead of its time.
Photo: NeXTSTEP

September 18 Today in Apple historySeptember 18, 1989: Steve Jobs’ company NeXT Inc. ships version 1.0 of NeXTSTEP, its object-oriented, multitasking operating system.

Incredibly advanced for its time, NeXTSTEP is described by The New York Times as “Macintosh on steroids.” In an ironic twist, the operating system Jobs plans to use to compete with Cupertino turns out to be one of the things that saves Apple a decade later.

Today in Apple history: After a horrible quarter, Gil Amelio gets the boot

By

Gil Amelio
This was the end of Amelio's 500 days running Apple.
Photo: Apple

July 6 Today in Apple history July 6, 1997: Following a massive quarterly loss for Apple, board member Edgar S. Woolard Jr. calls CEO Gil Amelio and informs him that he needs to step down. “You’ve done a lot to help the company, but the sales haven’t rebounded,” Woolard says.

Steve Jobs denies being responsible for Amelio’s ouster. However, the move results in him becoming Apple CEO for the first time. Now it’s time for a real turnaround!

Now anyone can try macOS High Sierra

By

Apple Beta Software Program
Get in on the new betas while they're hot.
Photo: Apple

Public testers can finally get their first taste of Apple’s new operating system for Mac starting today with the release of the first public beta of macOS High Sierra.

Apple’s new operating system was unveiled earlier this month at WWDC 2017 where the company showed off macOS High Sierra’s new features and improved design. Developers have been testing the new software since June 5th, but now anyone can get macOS High Sierra which is being billed as Apple’s best desktop operating system ever.

Today in Apple history: Yosemite brings a visual overhaul to OS X

By

Screen_Shot_2014-06-02_at_18-2
Yosemite more strongly visually resembled iOS than previous versions of OS X.
Photo: Apple

Jun2June 2, 2014: Apple shows off OS X 10.10 Yosemite for the first time at WWDC. Coming after the Jony Ive-redesigned iOS 7, Yosemite boasts a change in aesthetic that brings Apple’s desktop computers closer than ever to the look of the company’s mobile software.

Named after the Yosemite national park, OS X Yosemite follows the previous year’s Mavericks as the second Mac operating system to be named after a famous Californian landmark.

WWDC over the years: How it became a tech juggernaut

By

7630600426_e9f56e770d_k
WWDC has been home to some seismic announcements over the years.
Photo: Daniel Spiess/Flickr CC

North Korea gets its own ‘iPad’ knockoff

By

The Ryonghung iPad has more than 40 apps!
The Ryonghung iPad has more than 40 apps!
Photo: NK News

Recent rumors have promised exciting iPad launches this year, but none of them warned us about the Ryonghung iPad.

That could be because it wasn’t made by Apple. It’s a North Korean knockoff with an ugly design and terrible specifications, but it steals the iPad name in an effort to be more popular in a marker where Apple’s lawyers are unlikely to come knocking.

Today in Apple history: Steve Jobs spells out a new strategy for Mac OS

By

Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs introduced the world to OS X.
Photo: Ben Stanfield/Flickr CC

May11 May 11, 1998: As part of his mission to turn Apple around, Steve Jobs spells out the company’s Mac operating system strategy going forward.

The company will ship Mac OS 8.5 and the first customer release of an OS called Rhapsody that fall, he says at Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference in San Jose, California. The big news, however, is that Apple is hard at work creating a major new operating system called OS X, scheduled to arrive the following year.

Gatekeeper won’t stop this ‘major scale’ Mac malware

By

The OSX/Dok malware forces you to install a bogus OS X update.
The OSX/Dok malware forces you to install a bogus OS X update.
Image: Check Point

OSX/Dok, a new strain of “major scale” malware targeting macOS users, can bypass the Gatekeeper feature that’s designed to block malicious software.

The newly identified trojan, which prevents you from doing anything on your Mac until you install a bogus software update, also goes undetected by many antivirus programs.

New Word macro malware infects macOS and Windows

By

Beware untrusted Word macros.
Beware untrusted Word macros.
Photo: FortiGuard Labs

Another form of Microsoft Word malware that infects both macOS and Windows machines has been detected.

The malicious VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) code is buried in a Word document macro and automatically adapts its attack depending on the operating system used. Once installed, it can be used to download more payload files to your computer.