Today in Apple history: The seeds of OS X are sown

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nextstep
Look familiar?
Photo: The Color Convergence

Nov25November 25, 1996: Garrett L. Rice, a midlevel manager at NeXT, contacts Cupertino about the possibility of Apple licensing NeXT’s OpenStep operating system.

Rice’s communication with Ellen Hancock, Apple’s chief technology officer, is the first formal step in a long process. It ultimately leads to Apple buying NeXT, the creation of OS X, and Steve Jobs returning home to the company he co-founded.

Today in Apple history: OS X Panther claws its way onto Macs

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Mac OS X Panther brings Exposé and other new features.
Do you remember OS X Panther?
Image: Gudebookgallery/Apple

October 25 Today in Apple history October 25, 2003: Mac OS X Panther arrives on Macs, bringing a number of useful new features.

Exposé lets users instantly view all open windows at once; iChat AV allows users to talk with audio and video as well as text. The new Mac OS also makes Safari Apple’s default web browser for the first time.

Today in Apple history: OS 9 is ‘classic Mac’ operating system’s last stand

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Mac OS 9
Do you remember Mac OS 9?
Photo: Developers-Club

October 23: Today in Apple history October 23, 1999: Apple releases Mac OS 9, the last version of the classic Mac operating system before the company makes the leap to OS X a couple years later.

It does not veer far from OS 8 in terms of look and feel. However, OS 9 adds a few nifty features that make it well worth the upgrade.

Today in Apple history: NeXT customers get early taste of OS X

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NeXTstep
NeXTSTEP was an operating system ahead of its time.
Photo: NeXTSTEP

September 18 Today in Apple historySeptember 18, 1989: Steve Jobs’ company NeXT Inc. ships version 1.0 of NeXTSTEP, its object-oriented, multitasking operating system.

Incredibly advanced for its time, NeXTSTEP is described by The New York Times as “Macintosh on steroids.” In an ironic twist, the operating system Jobs plans to use to compete with Cupertino turns out to be one of the things that saves Apple a decade later.

Today in Apple history: After a horrible quarter, Gil Amelio gets the boot

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Bringing on Gil Amelio was viewed as a big coup for the Apple board.
This was the end of Amelio's 500 days running Apple.
Photo: Apple

July 6 Today in Apple history July 6, 1997: Following a massive quarterly loss for Apple, board member Edgar S. Woolard Jr. calls CEO Gil Amelio and informs him that he needs to step down. “You’ve done a lot to help the company, but the sales haven’t rebounded,” Woolard says.

Steve Jobs denies being responsible for Amelio’s ouster. However, the move results in him becoming Apple CEO for the first time. Now it’s time for a real turnaround!

Now anyone can try macOS High Sierra

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Apple Beta Software Program
Get in on the new betas while they're hot.
Photo: Apple

Public testers can finally get their first taste of Apple’s new operating system for Mac starting today with the release of the first public beta of macOS High Sierra.

Apple’s new operating system was unveiled earlier this month at WWDC 2017 where the company showed off macOS High Sierra’s new features and improved design. Developers have been testing the new software since June 5th, but now anyone can get macOS High Sierra which is being billed as Apple’s best desktop operating system ever.

Today in Apple history: Yosemite brings a visual overhaul to OS X

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Yosemite more strongly visually resembled iOS than previous versions of OS X.
Photo: Apple

Jun2June 2, 2014: Apple shows off OS X 10.10 Yosemite for the first time at WWDC. Coming after the Jony Ive-redesigned iOS 7, Yosemite boasts a change in aesthetic that brings Apple’s desktop computers closer than ever to the look of the company’s mobile software.

Named after the Yosemite national park, OS X Yosemite follows the previous year’s Mavericks as the second Mac operating system to be named after a famous Californian landmark.

WWDC over the years: How it became a tech juggernaut

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WWDC has been home to some seismic announcements over the years.
Photo: Daniel Spiess/Flickr CC

North Korea gets its own ‘iPad’ knockoff

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The Ryonghung iPad has more than 40 apps!
The Ryonghung iPad has more than 40 apps!
Photo: NK News

Recent rumors have promised exciting iPad launches this year, but none of them warned us about the Ryonghung iPad.

That could be because it wasn’t made by Apple. It’s a North Korean knockoff with an ugly design and terrible specifications, but it steals the iPad name in an effort to be more popular in a marker where Apple’s lawyers are unlikely to come knocking.