Slick security cam watches your house like an owl

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Keep an eye on your precious people, places and things with this great new monitor from Kodak.
Keep an eye on your precious people, places and things with this great new monitor from Kodak.
Photo: Rob LeFebvre/Cult of Mac

Lust List: CFH-V15 Video Monitor by Kodak

This new 350-degree pan and tilt home security camera from Kodak is the most amazing video monitor I’ve used, ever.

I’ve helped friends set up a few security cameras over the years, usually to keep an eye on their kids or pets, and the CFH-V15 blows all of them away with its ease of use, simple setup, and high-end video quality.

I sure wish I had one of these when my kids were young.

Kodak’s new Super 8 camera aims at keeping film alive

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Kodak Super 8 CES 2016
Kodak's bridging film and digital at CES 2016.
Photo: Kodak

Cult of Mac CES 2016 full coverageKodak is not prepared to let analog filmmaking disappear into the digital world.

At the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this week, the film-stock maker is showing off a prototype for a new camera that will combine time-honored, physical shooting techniques with the latest in digital technology. This powerful combination hopes to capture the best of both traditions, allowing present and future filmmakers to continue to produce their art in whichever way they see fit.

Color photography first gained a peel thanks to potatoes

This photograph was made in the early 1900s using the Autochrome process, which starts with dyed potato starch.
This photograph was made in the early 1900s using the Autochrome process, which starts with dyed potato starch.
Photo: Mervyn O’Gorman

The potato is one of the least colorful of the good Lord’s creations. But somehow, two French inventors figured out how the dud spud could help put color in our photographs.

 Before brothers Louis and Auguste Lumiere tinkered with taters, photographers were shooting three different pictures of the same scene through colored filters — red, blue and green — and then sandwiching the images for projection.

In 1904, the Lumieres pulverized potatoes into a starchy powder, which they then divided into three separate batches for dying violet-blue, green and orange-red. When mixed together and applied to a glass plate, the microscopic grains of potato filtered the light, creating a negative that could produce a color photo. The process was called Autochrome.

Apple And Google Win $527 Million Bid For Kodak Patent Trove [Report]

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Kodak-Logo

Back in early December, Apple and Google joined forces to purchase a patent trove from Kodak, the once-reigning photography king. Kodak’s collection includes 1,100 imaging patents that can be used to diffuse litigation between big companies in the tech industry.

To keep bidding wars from escalating, Apple and Google teamed up for the purchase. After filing for bankruptcy, Kodak said that its patent trove was worth $2 billion, but the U.S. court approved a $527 million price tag instead.

What the companies involved with this deal plan to do with the acquired patents remains to be seen.

Source: Bloomberg

Kodak Sells Digital Imaging Patents To Consortiums Backed By Apple, Google For $525 Million

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Struggling Kodak has finally agreed to sell its digital imaging patents to Intellectual Ventures and RPX Corporation — two consortiums backed by Apple, Google, Microsoft, and others — for $525 million. Kodak will receive a portion of the money from 12 intellectual property licensees, with each licensee receiving rights to the patents, while another portion will be paid by Intellectual Ventures, which will then acquire the digital imaging patent portfolio, plus the new and existing licenses.