Today in Apple history: QuickTime brings video to the masses

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Do you remember QuickTime 1.0?
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Dec2December 2, 1991: Apple ships its first public version of QuickTime, bringing video to Mac users running System 7.

Containing codecs for graphics, animation and video, QuickTime confirms Apple’s status as a leading multimedia tech company — and starts us all off on the path to playing video on our computers, which eventually leads to iTunes Movies, YouTube and more.

Today in Apple history: QuickTime 5 takes the world by storm

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QuickTime 5 was being downloaded 1 million times every three days.
Photo: Apple

this week in appleNovember 28, 2001: Apple says QuickTime 5 is being downloaded for Mac and PC a million times every three days, putting the software on track to exceed 100 million downloads in its first year of distribution.

The announcement comes as more and more websites adopt the MPEG-4 format for online videos, which is just starting to take off in a big way. In a pre-YouTube world, Apple has everything to gain!

Ex-NSA staffer reveals way to hack Mac’s camera and mic

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Mac App Store
You might want to put tape over your webcam.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Security researchers discovered a new way to hack the Mac’s built-in webcam this week, and the method is undetectable by users.

Apple built a green LED light into every Mac with firmware-level protection that turns on anytime the sensor is tripped by unauthorized access. The security feature has become increasingly difficult for hackers to beat, but former NSA staffer Patrick Wardle found a way to piggyback on outgoing feeds and record them.

Today in Apple history: QuickTime brings video to the Mac

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QuickTime was a breakthrough for Macs.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

July 8 July 8, 1991: The first beta version of QuickTime arrives, making it possible for people to play movies on their Macs for the first time, with no extra hardware needed.

While allowing videos to run on a computer seems par for the course in 2016, QuickTime represented an enormous leap forward in 1991 — and cemented Apple’s position as a groundbreaking computer company for creatives.

Windows users should delete QuickTime ASAP

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Apple is killing QuickTime for Windows.
Apple is killing QuickTime for Windows.
Photo: Apple

Apple is finally giving up on QuickTime for Windows, but the company doesn’t plan to fix a few critical flaws that still linger with the software.

If for some reason you’re still using QuickTime for Windows, it would be a really good idea to just uninstall it right now.

How to record your iPhone or iPad screen with QuickTime

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Start capturing your iOS gaming with this handy trick!
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

There are many reasons you may want to record your iPhone screen: demonstrations, tutorials, gaming and much more.

Sure, there are apps out there that can do this for you, but the only downside is that they use up valuable storage space on your iPhone or iPad. In this week’s Quick Tips video, I’m going to show you how to record your iOS device to your Mac in under a minute.

How Steve Jobs brought skeuomorphism back to Apple in 1999

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Photo: Dokas / CC Flickr
Photo: Dokas / CC Flickr

Although he gets most of the blame for it, skeuomorphism wasn’t really Scott Forstall’s fault. He was just following the orders of his boss and mentor, Steve Jobs. The man who gave the world the first skeumorphic consumer operating system, the Macintosh, loved computer interfaces with gaudy textures that made them look more like real-world things.

In fact, if it were not for Steve Jobs’s love of skeuomorphism, Apple’s design language might have been a lot flatter a lot earlier. When Steve Jobs came back to Apple in 1999, the company was moving away from skeuomorphic design… but Jobs bought it back, with the famous brushed metal texture in the Quicktime app.

Apple doesn’t want you posting your messy iOS screenshots on the web anymore

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It seems like a strange thing, but people who write about iOS apps on the web are often ashamed of their status bars. When they post screenshots of an app, they feel embarrassed by the fact that they don’t have a full signal from their cellular carrier, or a clear connection to WiFi, or 100% battery life. It’s an expression of the pursuit of perfection that marks Apple and its fans as a whole.

You wouldn’t think this is a pathology that Apple would really care about. But apparently, it does. And in OS X Yosemite and iOS 8, they’ve figured out a way to fix it.

Get 8 Essential Apps With The German Mac Bundle Featuring Parallels 8 [Deals]

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CoM - German Bundle

(Um die Details dieser Abmachung in deutscher Sprache zu lesen, klicken Sie hier.)

A bundle that contains 8 tremendous Mac apps at a ridiculously low price is rare, but one that contains those apps in German is nearly unheard of. Well, that’s what you’ll get with The German Mac Bundle – 8 killer apps (including apps like TextExpander, Soulver, and the ever-popular Parellels Desktop 8) in the German language for only €49.99 (that’s $65 USD)!