| Cult of Mac

Apple now offers parts and tools needed to fix your own iPhone

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Apple Self Service Program for customer repairs
Apple's Self Service Program is a major change to the company's repair policy.
Photo: Apple

The iPhone Self Service Program that Apple announced last fall launched Wednesday. It provides customers with the parts and tools they need to repair their own handsets. And it marks a major shift in the company’s approach to hardware fixes.

The program is for individuals, not small businesses.

Biden says his ‘right to repair’ order changed Apple policies

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President Joe Biden says his ‘right to repair’ order changed Apple policies.
A recent executive order takes a strong stance on users’ right to repair.
Photo: White House

President Joe Biden says an executive order he signed in mid-January forced companies to loosen restrictions on who can repair their devices.

“Companies like Apple and Microsoft are changing their policies so folks will be able to repair their devices themselves,” he said Monday.

Apple will sell parts and tools so customers can repair their own devices

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Apple Self Service Program for customer repairs
It's a major change to the company's repair policy.
Photo: Apple

Apple today revealed its new Self Service Program, which will provide customers with the parts and tools they need to repair their own devices. It marks a major shift in the company’s approach to hardware fixes.

The iPhone 12 and iPhone 13 lineups are the first to be supported, but will be soon followed by Mac computers powered by M1 chips, Apple said. The Self Service Program launches next year in the U.S., and will expand in 2022.

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak says it’s ‘time to recognize’ right to repair

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Steve Wozniak
Woz disagrees with Apple on Right to Repair.
Photo: The DEMO Conference/Flickr CC

Steve Wozniak may be the co-founder of Apple, but that doesn’t mean that he’s always in lockstep with the company’s policies or opinions. One area of difference appears to be on the topic of right to repair.

While Apple lobbyists helped shoot down multiple right to repair proposals, Woz seems extremely receptive to the topic.

Responding to a Cameo request from right to repair advocate Louis Rossmann, Woz said “it’s time to recognize the right to repair more fully.” He continued that he believes “companies inhibit it because it gives the companies power [and] control over everything.”

Apple’s T2 security chip makes life tough for independent repair shops, electronics recyclers

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The Apple T2 chip could be the source of mysterious crashes afflicting two of Apple's newest computers.
Many repairers and recyclers aren't too fond of this chip.
Photo: IFIXIT

Apple’s built-in laptop security safeguards, introduced with the 2018 MacBook Pros, are hitting independent repair shops and electronics recyclers hard, a report by Motherboard claims.

The system combines software security locks, various diagnostic requirements and Apple’s T2 security chip. Together, they mean that Macs stop working if they’re operated on by someone not using Apple’s proprietary repair tools.

Apple wants iPhone users to shun third-party battery replacements

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iPhone XR battery life is the best of any iPhone on the market.
You'll need to get your iPhone battery replacement carried out by one of Apple's chosen repairers.
Photo: Kristal Chan/Cult of Mac

Apple has long been trying to push users to shun third-party repairers and go through Apple for device repairs. Now it’s activated a previously dormant software lock on iPhone to try and crack down on battery replacements by third-party repairers.

That’s even the case if they’re replacing your battery with an official Apple battery.

Lobbyists for Apple help shoot down another Right to Repair bill

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Cult of Mac's buyback program pays good money for your gear, even broken ones.
This bill was proposed for Ontario, Canada.
Photo: Warren R.M. Stuart/Flickr CC

Tech lobbyists, backed by companies including Apple, have killed another Right to Repair bill, this time in Ontario.

The bill, put forward by Liberal MPP Michael Coteau, would have compelled companies to provide businesses and consumers with spare parts and repair manuals. It failed in its vote on Thursday after lobbying efforts.

Apple lobbyist helps push back Right to Repair vote in California

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Cult of Mac's buyback program pays good money for your gear, even broken ones.
Laws will be pushed back to 2020 at least.
Photo: Warren R.M. Stuart/Flickr CC

Right to Repair legislation in Apple’s home state of California has been successfully pushed back to at least January 2020. After intervention by an Apple lobbyist, the co-sponsor of the bill pulled it from committee on Tuesday.

“While this was not an easy decision, it became clear that the bill would not have the support it needed today, and manufacturers had sown enough doubt with vague and unbacked claims of privacy and security concerns,” said California Assembly member Susan Talamantes Eggman.

People could hurt themselves fixing their own iPhones, lobbyists warn

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Right to Repair
Apple doesn't want you opening up your devices.
Photo: iFixit

An Apple representative reportedly met with California legislators in an effort to kill a law that would make it easier for people to repair their own smartphones.

With initiatives like its battery replacement program, Apple helped extend the life of million of iPhones. But moves like this won’t please “right to repair” advocates.