Don’t skip this crucial step if you want your app to be awesome [ProTip]

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Bill Atkinson portrait MacPaint
Bill Atkinson, the creator of MacPaint, has crucial advice for coders.
Photo: Jim DeVona/Flickr CC

Pro_Tip_Cult_of_Mac SAN FRANCISCO — If you want to make a truly killer app, here’s a crucial part of the creative process you shouldn’t overlook: Give your “finished” software to someone, ask them to do something with it, and then shut the hell up.

Observe their interaction with the app, and you’ll learn what you’re doing right — and what you’re doing wrong.

That priceless piece of advice comes from Bill Atkinson, an Apple veteran who coded some of the greatest Mac software of all time, including HyperCard and MacPaint.

What iPhone 6s ads designed in MacPaint would look like

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What would ads for iPhone look like if it came out in 1985?
What would ads for iPhone look like if it came out in 1985?
Photo: Apple

Apple’s marketing team creates gorgeous ads that show every minuscule detail of new iPhones, but what would the images look like if they were produced using the original Macintosh and MacPaint?

Some redditor with way too much time on his or her hands decided to dig out an old Mac and find out, and the results are actually pretty fantastic.

Inspired by MacPaint, Rogue Invader mixes retro art with modern gameplay

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Modern game, retro look. Does FOX know about these Zenos?
Modern game, retro look. Does FOX know about these Zenos?
Photo: Squishy Games

Upcoming sci-fi shooter Rogue Invader looks like a massive HyperCard stack in glorious motion. Currently on Kickstarter to fund the last bit of development, the roguelike game is the brainchild of Squishy Games founder Nathan Rees, who’s been making games ever since he discovered the joys of MacPaint as a kid.