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A good VPN adds an essential layer of security to your Mac.
A good VPN adds an essential layer of security to your Mac.
Photo: John Sting/Unsplash CC

Apple fixes major Zoom video conferencing security flaw

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Zoom video conferencing for Mac
These people all know they are on a Zoom call.
Photo: Zoom

Mac users who’ve used the Zoom video conferencing application can now be assured that a serious security flaw has been dealt with. Apple pushed out a patch that removed the vulnerability from every Mac, without users needing to do anything.

Before the fix, the flaw potentially let malicious websites force people into Zoom video calls.

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Step up your iPhone and Mac security with these tips.
Step up your iPhone and Mac security with these tips.
Photo: Free Photos/Pixabay CC

This bundle of Mac apps is like a cybersecurity utility belt [Deals]

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This bundle of 7 cyber security apps will bring you to Fort Knox levels of protection.
This bundle of seven cybersecurity apps will bring your Mac to Fort Knox levels of protection.
Photo: Cult of Mac Deals

It’s hard to know if we’re doing enough to protect our online identities and data these days. Got an email password with a dozen alternating numbers, letters and an upside-down question mark but somehow your email still gets hacked? This bundle of seven cybersecurity apps will cover the vulnerabilities in your Mac. And right now the whole shebang is going for just $52 at Cult of Mac Deals.

Super-simple exploit lets malware creep onto your Mac

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It's really easy to bypass Mac's Gatekeeper.
It's really easy to bypass Mac's Gatekeeper.
Photo: Apple

Apple’s Gatekeeper feature was designed to keep even the most advanced users from accidentally installing malicious software on their computers, but a super-simple exploit lets hackers sneak malware onto your Mac.

The exploit was discovered by Patrick Wardle, director of research at security firm Synack. Wardle found that the exploit is made possible thanks to a key design shortcoming in Gatekeeper that lets an attacker use a binary file already trusted by Apple to execute malicious files.

Here’s how it works:

Thunderstrike 2 worm can infect your Mac without detection

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12-inch MacBook
Get yours for just $999.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Apple has touted the Mac’s resistance to viruses for decades as a selling point over Windows PCs, but a team of researchers have created a new firmware worm for Mac that might just make you want to go back to doing work on good old pencil and paper.

Two white-hat hackers discovered that several vulnerabilities affecting PC makers can also bypass Apple’s renowned security to wreak havoc on Mac firmware. The two created a proof-of-concept of the worm called Thunderstrike 2 that allows firmware attacks to be spread automatically from Mac to Mac. Devices don’t even need to be networked for the worm to spread, and once it’s infected your machine the only way to remove it is to open up your Mac and manually reflash the chip.

Here’s a preview of Thunderstrike 2 in action:

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One quick selfie could win you a MacBook Air. Photo: Bitdefender
One quick selfie could win you a MacBook Air. Photo: Bitdefender
Photo:

Mac App Blocker Protects Your Apps [Deals]

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wpid-Photo-2012-09-07-946-AM.jpg

 

We all—or should—password protect our Macs. Start up, login. Come out of sleep, login. Deactivate the screensaver, login (though technically that’s just unlocking). What about “fire up Chrome” or “start up Evernote”? We don’t usually think about entering a password to do those tasks. Maybe we should.

Mac App Blocker is, frankly, a new one on my. It’s an app that lets you set application passwords. Launch Mail, enter a password. Chrome…Evernote…Word… you get the idea. Interesting, huh?