3 Apple Watch studies you can join to help fight COVID-19

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Stanford COVID-19 Wearables Study is open to Apple Watch and Fitbit wearers.
The Stanford COVID-19 Wearables Study looks to see if your Apple Watch or Fitbit can detect a coronavirus infection before you know you have it.
Photo: Stanford University

Scientists want to know if the health data an Apple Watch collects can be used to diagnose COVID-19. There are multiple research studies currently open to those with Apple’s wearable.

Participants contribute to the goal of detecting the illness before the wearer knows they’re sick.

Stanford probes if Apple Watch can detect COVID-19

Among the more prominent of the COVID-19 related studies is being done by Stanford University. The study’s overview states: “We are trying to find out if information from wearable devices, like Fitbit and Apple Watch, can be used to track infectious diseases like COVID-19. We hope to be able to predict the onset even before any symptoms start.”

Participants must be willing to wear their device continuously, download an app, and fill out a daily symptom survey. The study will go on for up to two years.

The Stanford Covid-19 Wearables Study is looking for volunteers who have had COVID-19, or been exposed to it. Those with a higher risk of exposure are also welcome. All others are asked to hold off joining for now.

More coronavirus research studies for wearables owners

SFGate compiled a list of additional research studies looking for participants with an Apple Watch or rival wearable.

The Scripps Detect Study looks to confirm recent research indicating that an elevated heart rate could mean the wearer has caught a viral infection but isn’t yet aware of it.

Joining the Digital Engagement & Tracking for Early Control & Treatment study just requires owning an Apple Watch, or another wearable if it shares data with the Google Fit Android application.

Duke Covidentify is currently open to only Fitbit and Garmin users, but is working to add Apple Watch support. Researchers ask participants to answer two simple questions each day for 30 days, and then every week for two months.

All three studies are looking for volunteers.