Turn your phone into a virtual reality portal [Deals]

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DSCVR easily turns almost any mobile device into a VR viewscreen.
DSCVR easily turns almost any mobile device into a VR viewscreen.
Photo: Cult of Mac Deals

Virtual reality is finally here…if you can afford it. Picking up one of those sleek new headsets is going to set you back hundreds of dollars, but why drop so much coin when you’ve already got most of what you need for immersive VR in your pocket? DSCVR easily turns your mobile device into a full fledged VR headset for iOS or Android, and right now you can get one for just $24.99.

This headset turns your smartphone into a virtual reality gateway [Deals]

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Homido's VR Headset converts your smartphone into the processor and screen for fully immersive virtual reality experiences.
Homido's VR Headset converts your smartphone into the processor and screen for fully immersive virtual reality experiences.
Photo: Cult of Mac Deals

The age of virtual reality is here, and you’re probably closer to taking part in this exciting new form of interaction and storytelling than you think. If you’ve got a smart phone, you’ve got most of what you need to drop into virtual reality today — the only other thing you’ll need is something like the Homido VR Headset. Simply slide your smartphone into the headset’s receiver and you’re on your way to another reality, all for $69.95 at Cult of Mac Deals.

Virtual reality is going to make everyone sick — including companies that dump billions into it

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The awe you feel will be cut fairly short. Photo: Sergey Galyonkin/CC
The awe you feel will be cut fairly short. Photo: Sergey Galyonkin/CC

When my kids and I walked into a coffee shop one sunny day last month, we were greeted by a row of tables holding laptops with gaming demos.

My son gravitated toward the biggest display, a huge TV screen with a giant, face-obscuring set of goggles set in front of it. This was the Oculus Rift, the latest fad gaming device that places two stereoscopic images in front of your eyes to simulate virtual reality.

He slid the massive black eyewear onto his face, picked up the connected Xbox controller, and started moving his head around. The rest of us could see the game on the TV — an abstract shooting gallery in three dimensions, with my boy at the center, first-person style.

After about five minutes of waving his head around and pressing buttons on the controller, my son pushed the goggles up and off his head and said, “Dad, I think I’m going to be sick.”