Vietnam War photos leave haunting impressions on artist’s unlikely canvas

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A new look at an old conflict

With images like Holding #2, Binh Danh uses leaves and documentary photographs to revisit the Vietnam War.

Gary McColloug, 20

Binh Danh's 2008 chlorophyll print on grass and resin shows 20-year-old Gary McColloug, whose photo appeared in 1969 Life magazine article, "Faces of the American Dead: One Week's Dead."

Memory of Tuol Sleng Prison, Child 6

A photo of a child from Pol Pot's secret prison, Tuol Sleng.

US soldier

From Binh Danh's chlorophyll print series Immortality, The Remnants of the Vietnam and American War.

Untitled (Combat 2)

From Binh Danh's chlorophyll print series Immortality, The Remnants of the Vietnam and American War.

US soldier

From the Immortality, The Remnants of the Vietnam and American War series.

Self-immolation of Thich Quang Duc

From Binh Danh's chlorophyll print series Immortality, The Remnants of the Vietnam and American War.

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A camouflaged leaf

From Binh Danh's Military Foliage series.

In memory of our troops: 6371 December 25, 2011.

An original "camera exposed" daguerreotype.

The coiled hose left a mark on the grass, a fading of color where the sun could not shine.

From this moment on his front lawn, Binh Danh realized he could create a photographic process using sunlight, leaves and grass. He had no idea his method would develop into an organic process of self-discovery.

On leaves from his family’s garden, Danh brings fresh examination to an old war, printing haunted faces and horrific scenes from the Vietnam conflict with light and chlorophyll.

Apple targeting Vietnam as its next big iPhone market

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iPhone5s

Smartphone user habits may change depending on where you are in the world, but one thing remains largely the same: the iPhone (and Apple brand) is a status symbol.

With that in mind, Apple is tapping FPT Corp., Vietnam’s biggest listed information and communication technology company, to help grow its market share across Vietnam and Southeast Asia.

As with China, developing markets such as Vietnam represent important potential hotbeds for Apple to target, and establishing a presence early is of the utmost importance. According to Lam Nguyen, Ho Chi Minh City-based country director at International Data Corp, Vietnamese smartphone sales will increase by around 56 percent to 12 million units in 2014 alone — and Apple should be in a position to get a large chunk of those sales.