All items tagged with "Terminal"

Use Single-User Mode To Solve Wonky Mac OS X Issues [OS X Tips]

fsck

I saw this tip over at OS X Daily today, and it reminded me of all the times I did this as a Mac IT guy a couple of jobs back.

See, every so often, the Macs where I worked would start to act weird. Nothing truly game-stopping — just little things, stuff that was easily worked around but always a little bit annoying. The first stop when things are weird, for me, was always Repair Permissions in the Disk Utility app. I’d usually then Verify the disk in that very same app, and see if it returned any errors. If not, I’d usually drop into single-user mode and do a file system check.

Here’s how to do just that.

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OptiPNG Shrinks Screenshots Without Quality Loss

OptiPNG Shrinks Screenshots Without Quality Loss

If you liked my how-to on rolling your own ImageMagick-based OS X Services using shell scripts, you’re going to love OptiPNG. It’s another command line utility that can be used to shrink PNGs without losing any quality.

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Do It Your Way – Set A Custom Delay Period To Unhide The Dock [OS X Tips]

Dock Unhide Delay

I routinely hide the Dock on my Macbook Air, since it takes up a significant portion of my screen. While I use Alfred most of the time to launch apps and such, I still like to use the Dock; call it a hold over from the last ten years or so.

Sometimes, though, when I move the mouse cursor over to the side of the screen I keep the Dock on (the left, if you’re curious), it pops up even when I don’t want it to.

Then I found this Terminal command which lets me set the time delay between when my cursor hits the edge of my screen and when the Dock actually appears. Now I have the delay period set to a larger number, making it much slower to respond and unhide.

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You’ll Need To Install Java On OS X Mavericks Beta [OS X Tips]

java-logo

As we continue to look at some tips for the new OS X beta this week, remember that OS X Mavericks isn’t a final version—it’s meant to be used by developers to ensure that their software will work with Apple’s latest and greatest.

With that disclaimer in mind, let’s continue.

If you need to use Java for any reason on your Mac, and you install OS X Mavericks beta on it, you’ll be sad when you try and run that Java-reliant bit of software.

For me, it was setting up the Minecraft server for my kid after I installed the beta last night to take a look at things. When I went to run it in Terminal, I got an error, saying there was no Java installed. So, even though I’d had Java installed in Mac OS X Mountain Lion, the Mavericks install seems to have taken Java off my Mac. No worries; it was kind of an easy fix.

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Brett ‘I Just Built This’ Terpstra Adds Reminders To Nvalt

Brett “I just built this” Terpstra has been at it again. Inspired by Evernote’s new reminders feature, launched last week, Brett decided to add something similar to his app NValt, itself a fork of the notable Notational Velocity. It’s called “nvremind,” and it’s pretty awesome.

Now, just by tagging a note with “@remind,” you’ll be sent a notification or an e-mail at the chosen time, and in Mountain Lion, clicking the notification will take you to the note in NValt.

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Save Space On Your Hard Drive – Disable SafeSleep Mode On Your Mac [OS X Tips]

SafeSleep Mode Disable

Warning – this tip is fairly advanced. Use it at your own risk.

There’s a feature that debuted back in 2005, called SafeSleep. Basically, it’s a hibernation mode designed to save the current state of your running Mac, so that it can start up exactly the same way you left it when you put the Mac to sleep, even if the battery runs out and it shuts down completely.

In OS Lion, Apple introduced two new features, called Autosave and Resume which mirrors this functionality. Turning off SafeSleep, then, is really just disabling a duplicate feature. It shouldn’t affect Autosave or Resume if you’re running OS Lion or later, and it could potentially save you gigabytes of hard drive space.

Here’s how to do it, though we caution you not to do this if you’re even slightly uncomfortable with the idea.

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There Is A Surreal Cyberpunk Adventure Game Built Into OS X That You Never Knew About

Screen Shot 2013-04-15 at 10.55.33 AM

OS X comes with an almost non-existent collection of games by default. You’ve got a really lackluster chess game that hasn’t been updated for over a decade… and that’s pretty much it.

But did you know OS X has a secret game you’ve probably never seen, built right into the kernel of the operating system? It does, but don’t expect something on the level of Infinity Blade, or even Wolfenstein 3D… think more primitive. There’s a text adventure game built right into Terminal!

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Mastering OS X Calendar: Customize The Number Of Days Shown [OS X Tips]

Still better than the Beatles.

Still better than the Beatles.

Remember that tip we gave you about showing more than seven days in a week in iCal? It’s been a while (and the app is now called Calendar), but there used to be a way to enable a Debug menu in iCal to allow you to open multiple windows, change the number of weeks that appear before and after the start date in Day View, and even show more than just seven days in a week.

Well, that debug menu has gone the way of Mac OS X Lion, but there is a cool Terminal command that does the same thing.

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Mastering OS X Calendar: Change The Time You Get Notified Of All Day Events [OS X Tips]

Calendar Default Event Time

When you create a Calendar event, you have the option to have your Mac notify you of that event before it happens. In the case of an all-day event, however, you don’t have an easy option to change the time of day you’ll get the notification.

It can be done, however, with a little digging into the filesystem and a configuration file, letting you change the time of day you’re notified by default for all-day events.

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Customize Mission Control To Show Only Windows From Current Desktop Space [OS X Tips]

Mission Control

When you activate Mission Control, it will show you all the windows for currently running apps, as in the screenshot above. If you click on a window that’s in a different Desktop Space, your Mac will swoosh you over to that window, taking you out of the Space you’re currently in.

To avoid that from happening, you can force Mission Control to only show you windows from open apps in the current Desktop Space. Here’s how.

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