iOS 7 Adoption Rate Already Beats Latest Version Of Android

iOS7

iOS 7 has been out for less than one day, and already has an adoption rate of over 13 percent, according to analytics firm, Mixpanel. Compare that with Google’s latest version of Jellybean for Android devices, which hovers around an 8.5 percent adoption rate after a month.

iOS 7 Adoption Rate

As you can see in Mixpanel’s live data chart above, iOS 7 has been adopted by 13.45 percent at the time of this writing. Mixpanel told us that they measure this data from the over 1,420 businesses that hire them to track actions in mobile apps and websites, including iOS versions.

Techmeme’s Gabe Rivera is already seeing a two to one iOS 7 to iOS 6 ratio for visits to its website, and our own web analytics show iOS 7 rising to the top of the user agents, as well.

Apple’s mobile operating system has historically shown a much larger rate of adoption than Google’s, perhaps due to the many more devices that use Android, and Apple’s own approach to hardware and software integration. Last October, a month after iOS 6’s release, CNET reported that iOS adoption rates were at 63 percent. Just this past July, Apple sent an email to developers to brag about its 93 percent adoption, asking devs to compare to Android, which at the time hovered somewhere between 20 and 30 percent adoption of the latest Android operating system.

The entry of a company like Mixpanel into the fray of measurable action items to show the level of mobile OS adoption will be telling as companies release their official numbers in the future. Perhaps Mixpanel will follow the rate of the upcoming Android system, KitKat, with as much detail as it is the iOS 7 release, and we’ll be able to compare directly within the same measurement system. Hooray!

  • ctt1wbw

    This is impossible. Android is open source, which means anyone running any version of Android can just download the kernel and install it on their phone… right? I mean if my iPhone 4, which is 3 years old, can get updated to iOS 7, then surely a 3 year old Android phone can get updated to 4.3 right?

  • Gregory Wright

    IOS vs. Android adoption rate is very very deceptive. When Google introduces a new version of Android its not a simple matter for everyone with an Android phone to upgrade immediately. The reason: http://goo.gl/jTHdJ. This issue is the biggest advantage IOS has over Android. So, the subject of this article is not new. In all probability IOS will always beat Android.

  • bitechtual_biddie

    This is impossible. Android is open source, which means anyone running any version of Android can just download the kernel and install it on their phone… right? I mean if my iPhone 4, which is 3 years old, can get updated to iOS 7, then surely a 3 year old Android phone can get updated to 4.3 right?

    No. Android being open source just means OEMs no longer have to build an OS from scratch. That’s really all it means.

    In an attempt to thwart this, however, Google did move most feature updates out of the actual OS and into an app that is updated through the Play Store. Personally, I think people should buy tech (and everything else really) for what it is. If you don’t think you can be happy with it for the duration of your contract, don’t buy it. You buy an OS for a computer, you don’t expect free updates for years and years. You live with XP for 10 years… or Snow Leopard for 6 years. I don’t feel like looking up the real numbers, but I know people still running SL.

    But, can’t we all just get along?

  • gahhhhnooo

    Androids latest version is lemon pie with an amazing 0% adoption rate.

  • samuel16004

    YIAAAAAHH TAKE THAT ANDROID!!! Apple4Ever! Love you apple, loving my io7!

  • Paul Burt

    This is impossible. Android is open source, which means anyone running any version of Android can just download the kernel and install it on their phone… right? I mean if my iPhone 4, which is 3 years old, can get updated to iOS 7, then surely a 3 year old Android phone can get updated to 4.3 right?

    The Motorola Photon was a high-end phone when it was released back in July 2011, just 2 years ago. Motorola confirmed it wouldn’t even get 4.0 ICS, let alone 4.3 JB or 4.4 KK.

About the author

Rob LeFebvreAnchorage, Alaska-based freelance writer and editor Rob LeFebvre has contributed to various tech, gaming and iOS sites, including 148Apps, Creative Screenwriting, Shelf-Awareness, VentureBeat, and Paste Magazine. Feel free to find Rob on Twitter @roblef, and send him a cookie once in a while; he'll really appreciate it.

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