Wall Street’s Nuts, Here’s Proof Apple’s Innovating As Fast As It Ever Has

pillarsofappleproducts

Wall Street has spent most of the last six months hyperventilating about the future of Apple, chomping at their fingernails and openly wondering if Apple is taking too long to innovate in the post-Jobs era.

Over at the Apple Gazette, Robin Parrish has put together a simple graphic, showing Apple’s historic product pillars. Essentially, if you add it all up, the average time between major product pillars for Apple is three years and ten months.

The graphic leaves a lot of stuff out, like operating system updates, new software, new features, new additions to iTunes, etc. But basically, we’re still about a year away from a major new Apple product announcement… a totally new hardware pillar for the business, not just an iterative refinement or minor product.

Looking at Apple’s historic product pipeline in this kind of streamlined way makes it pretty clear that Apple’s innovating just as fast as it ever did, if not faster. Also, a major new Apple pillar is due in the next year and a half, and what do you know: it looks like the iWatch might just be it.

  • Ed_Kel

    It’s clear that Wall Street is only looking at Apple’s innovation in terms of “new” product categories. From there, they have a point. It depends on how you look at it. I can see your point of view and I can see Wall Street’s point of view. What really matters is how the public perceives Apple and unfortunately, updates to existing products or new iterations of existing products (the Macbook Pro is nice but it’s still a Mac – just like the iMac) aren’t considered “innovations” in the eyes of the public.

  • MrsCleaver

    Indeed, Wall Street is nuts. The headlines are filled with proclamations like, “Innovation is key to Apple’s Rebound”, and “Apple Losing It’s Creative Edge.”

    It’s all crap. The so-called “analysts” don’t have a CLUE what’s going on. They look at insignificant data, or at least data that’s so small it barely matters, and make their dire warnings about things they have no knowledge of. Analysts do not create technology, nor do they innovate. The only thing they “create” is fear in the shaky market, mostly among greedy investors who expect companies to outperform themselves every single quarter after quarter.

    NO company has brought to market more significant, world-changing products than Apple. Not even the great American inventor Thomas Edison managed output as fast and significant in such a short period. (Taking nothing away from Thomas Edison, mind you.) And yet, the “analysts” want to see more… and more… and more.

    Personally, I think analysts secretly make money on every pronouncement, positive or negative. They are most likely tied directly into the accounts of their trading buddies, and make a lot of dough when they scare investors with their BS. One need look no further than the first four letters of “analyst” to see where most of their worth, integrity and creativity comes from.

  • Ed_Kel

    Indeed, Wall Street is nuts. The headlines are filled with proclamations like, “Innovation is key to Apple’s Rebound”, and “Apple Losing It’s Creative Edge.”

    It’s all crap. The so-called “analysts” don’t have a CLUE what’s going on. They look at insignificant data, or at least data that’s so small it barely matters, and make their dire warnings about things they have no knowledge of. Analysts do not create technology, nor do they innovate. The only thing they “create” is fear in the shaky market, mostly among greedy investors who expect companies to outperform themselves every single quarter after quarter.

    NO company has brought to market more significant, world-changing products than Apple. Not even the great American inventor Thomas Edison managed output as fast and significant in such a short period. (Taking nothing away from Thomas Edison, mind you.) And yet, the “analysts” want to see more… and more… and more.

    Personally, I think analysts secretly make money on every pronouncement, positive or negative. They are most likely tied directly into the accounts of their trading buddies, and make a lot of dough when they scare investors with their BS. One need look no further than the first four letters of “analyst” to see where most of their worth, integrity and creativity comes from.

    It’s a slippery slope. People buy into companies like Apple based on Projections. The analysts were off on the i5 sales and everyone jumped ship though their sales were still record breaking. You can’t really force blame on anyone in situations like these. Analysts get paid to “analyze” and they made projections based off of previous gains and projected sales.

  • RenevandenRadio

    This was a sure thing to come. During the last years not only Wall Street but the whole world hyped Apple in a ridiculous way. And when you’re The Perfect Number One there only one possible future: downward. It’s only logical the youth no longer sees Apple as the number one cool; it’s amazing it took so long. And it’s only logical other brands also are by now also making good telephones and tablets.
    Analysts now are disappointed when sales of The New Gadget only grow with 200% instead of 250, as they anticipated. One could also argue that they were just wrong, and are not as good as one might think.
    The danger is that such persons can do real damage and that is how the financial world functions: prices can go up simply because the markets are afraid that there could happen something to be afraid of.

    I love my Apple computers, iPhone and iPad. But I think I would be more happy when Apple is no longer so much in the spotlights, if only for averting the attention of virus creators.

    René van den Abeelen, the Netherlands

  • Derek Schlicker

    Apple was at its best when it was a niche player where not everyone in the world had their products. I don’t think we’ll ever go back to that but I’ll be glad if/when the overhyped financial analysts quit making uneducated and ill conceived calls on where the company is headed.

About the author

John BrownleeJohn Brownlee is a Contributing Editor. He has also written for Wired, Playboy, Boing Boing, Popular Mechanics, VentureBeat, and Gizmodo. He lives in Boston with his wife and two parakeets. You can follow him here on Twitter.

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