Today in Apple history: Windows scores big victory over Mac

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Windows used a number of elements of the Mac UI
Windows used a number of elements of the Mac UI.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

July 25 TIAH July 25, 1989: Apple suffers a major setback in its copyright infringement lawsuit against Microsoft for allegedly stealing the Mac’s “look and feel” to create Windows.

Apple sued Microsoft on 189 counts of copyright infringement relating to Windows 2.0.3. The judge overseeing the case throws out 179 of them. This paves the way for Microsoft’s dominance over Apple in the coming decade.

Today in Apple history: Steve Jobs visits the Soviet Union

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Soviet Apple flag
This was Steve Jobs' one and only trip to the Soviet Union.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

July 4 Today in Apple history July 4, 1985: Steve Jobs visits Moscow for the first time, with the aim of selling Macs to the Russians.

During his two-day trip, Jobs lectures computer science students in the Soviet Union, attends a Fourth of July party at the American embassy, discusses opening a Mac factory in Russia, and reportedly almost runs afoul of the KGB by praising assassinated Marxist revolutionary Leon Trotsky.

Today in Apple history: Steve Jobs attempts a boardroom coup

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Jobs
Sadly for Steve, things didn't work in his favor.
Photo: Esther Dyson/Flickr CC

May23May 23, 1985: Bitter about being ousted from his position running the Macintosh division, 30-year-old Steve Jobs attempts to stage a coup to seize control of Apple from CEO John Sculley.

He plans to overthrow Sculley while he is away on a business trip in China. Unfortunately for Jobs, he makes the mistake of trying to recruit the support of Apple executive Jean-Louis Gassée, who informs Sculley of the plot.

It’s the beginning of the end for Steve Jobs’ first tenure at Apple.

Today in Apple history: Apple introduces the doomed Apple III

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The Apple III should have been a smash hit. It wasn't.
Photo: Alker33/YouTube

May19May 19, 1980: Apple introduces the Apple III at the National Computer Conference (NCC) in Anaheim, California.

After two years of development, the Apple III is the computer Apple thinks will be the successor to its enormously successful Apple II. Instead, it turns out to be the company’s first major misstep.

Today in Apple history: John Sculley starts work as Apple CEO

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john-sculley
John Sculley was Apple's third president and CEO.
Photo: Web Summit/Flickr CC

May17May 17, 1983: John Sculley starts work at Apple as its third president and CEO, following Mike Scott and Mike Markkula.

As the former boss of Pepsi-Cola, Sculley is lured to Apple by Steve Jobs, who uses one of the most famous lines in the history business: “Do you want to spend the rest of your life selling sugared water or do you want a chance to change the world?”

Today in Apple history: Macintosh 512Ke further enhances the Mac

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The 512Ke muddies the Mac waters just a smidge.
Photo: Vectronicsappleworld

April14 April 14, 1986: The “low-cost” Macintosh 512Ke brings hardware upgrades — and a bit of confusion — to the low end of the Mac lineup.

The Mac 512Ke is an “enhanced” (hence the “e”) model of the Mac 512K, which addressed complaints that the original Mac didn’t come with enough memory. The 512Ke adds a double-density 800k floppy drive and a 128k ROM to the Mac 512K formula.

Today in Apple history: Steve Jobs loses control of the Mac

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Mac 128k Beauty Shot
Steve Jobs was distraught at being removed as general manager of the Mac division.
Photo: iFixit

Ap10 April 10, 1985: During a fateful meeting, Apple CEO John Sculley threatens to resign unless the Apple board removes Steve Jobs as executive VP and general manager of the Macintosh division.

This triggers a series of events that will ultimately result in Jobs’ exit. The marathon board meeting — which continued for several hours the next day — results in the Apple co-founder losing his operating role within the company, but being allowed to stay on as chairman. Things don’t exactly play out like that.

Today in Apple history: Future Apple CEO John Sculley is born

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Fremont, California, 1990.
John Sculley in Fremont, California, 1990.
Photo: Doug Menuez/Fearless Genius

April6 April 6, 1939: John Sculley is born in New York City. He will grow up to be hailed as a business and marketing genius, eventually overseeing Apple’s transformation into the most profitable personal computer company in the world.

After a remarkable stint as president of Pepsi-Cola, Sculley will take over as Apple’s third CEO in 1983. He runs Apple for a 10-year period, guiding the creation of the revolutionary Newton MessagePad. During Sculley’s decade at the helm, Apple sells more personal computers than any other company. But he’s still remembered for his role in kicking Steve Jobs out of Apple.

Today in Apple history: Microsoft gets sued for ripping off Mac OS

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Windows used a number of elements of the Mac UI
Windows used a number of elements of the Mac UI.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

March17March 17, 1988: Apple sues Microsoft for allegedly stealing 189 different elements of its Macintosh operating system to create Windows 2.0.

The incident, which causes a deep rift between Apple and one of its former top developers, paves the way for an epic battle between the two companies that will rage for years.