Production halts on all currently filming Apple TV+ shows

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Hollywood and Apple TV+ shows join the fray in shutting down operations temporarily in wake of the coronavirus.
Photo: Apple

Apple has suspended all filming of Apple TV+ projects currently in production, according to a published report Friday.

The shows include the science fiction series For All Mankind, the Stephen King miniseries Lisey’s Story, the science fiction drama See, the TV drama The Morning Show, the psychological horror television series Servant, and the Isaac Asimov sci-fi series Foundation.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, the shows have shut down production temporarily to control the spread of the coronavirus with most of the productions taking place in California.

On Thursday, Apple’s The Morning Show halted production on season two for two weeks as a precaution.

“In concert with our dedicated partners at Apple, we have concluded it would be prudent to take a two-week hiatus to assess the situation and ensure the safety of the incredible people who make this show,” Michael Ellenberg, founder and CEO of Media Res, said in a statement to Deadline.

Netflix and Amazon have also shut down all scripted TV and film physical production for two weeks. Disney TV Studios, CBS, Showtime, NBCUniversal, Warner Bros. Television Group, Paramount TV Studios, and the CW have postponed production on all or part of their TV content.

Other TV studios, sources told The Hollywood Reporter, are in the midst of discussions about whether or not to suspend productions and those decisions are likely to be made soon.

Daytime and late-night shows have either stopped production or will shoot future episodes without a live studio audience. The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy FallonLate Night with Seth Meyers and The Late Show With Stephen Colbert had previously said they would continue production, but without a live studio audience. However, all three late-night programs have now suspended production even before a previously planned break was to have begun the week of March 23.

It remains unclear if cast and crew members of all the impacted programs will continue to be paid.

Sources told The Hollywood Reporter that some studio executives have modified scripts that call for a large number of extras in a bid to control the number of people on one set or location.

At present, there are over 2,100 confirmed cases in the U.S. and 49 deaths. In California, there are over 247 confirmed cases – the third highest in the nation – with five deaths.