iPhone slowdown lawsuit wants to examine Apple’s battery data

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iPhone
iPhone slowdown case has caused multiple lawsuits around the world.
Photo: Apple

Apple has said that it will reduce the cost of replacement batteries as a result of its iPhone slowdown controversy. However, according to a new lawsuit leveled against Apple this practice could wind up destroying valuable evidence.

In a motion filed in Los Angeles by lawyer Adam Levitt of DiCello Levitt & Casey, the claimant says that it is important to, “maintain and preserve any data [Apple] collects through diagnostic testing in order to protect the claims of all affected consumers.” In other words, stop throwing away batteries!

“Given the ever-changing nature of Apple’s battery replacement program and the critical importance of that diagnostic data to this lawsuit, Apple should be required to preserve that data and produce it to Plaintiff’s counsel,” Levitt said in a statement.

“Apple has a policy of getting rid of batteries it pulls out of phones, and we want the diagnostics. We want to make sure everything is preserved,” he told USA Today in an interview.

Apple hasn’t yet commented on the lawsuit.

A PR nightmare for Apple

Apple has previously admitted to issuing a software upgrade for iOS which causes older iPhones to slow down. However, Apple has said that it did this to prolong the life of their lithium-ion batteries, rather than anything intended to push users to upgrade.

In the aftermath, the company notified customers that it will reduce the price on out-of-warranty iPhone battery replacements by $50, putting the cost at just $29. The offer covers anyone with an iPhone 6 or later whose battery needs to be replaced. Customers can take advantage of the new price starting later this month. It will be available worldwide until December 2018.

While it’s possible to argue that Apple has done nothing wrong here (apart from possibly not being as clear as it should have from the start), the ensuing PR nightmare has echoed around the world. At present, a plethora of lawsuits have been brought against Apple, while demands for explanations have been made by officials in countries including Brazil, South Korea, and France.

In South Korea, 370,000 individuals — or the equivalent of one out of every 138 people who live in the country — have signed up to join a class action suit against Apple. This week, a Chinese consumer group also added its name to the list by requesting more information from Apple about its purposeful slowing down of older iPhones as their batteries degrade.

Source: USA Today