iPhone 6 to feature Quad HD resolution?

Apple-iPhone-6-Mockup-26

Could the iPhone 6 boast a Quad HD display, packing a 2560 x 1440 resolution in line with the 5.5-inch LG G3?

That’s the word on the street according to a source citing “Apple employees” from Hong Kong, although it is not clear which iPhone 6 model is being referred to. If this is the case, it would give the give the iPhone 6 by far the most stunningly beautiful screen of any Apple smartphone ever.

It wouldn’t have to mean that it eats up battery life like nobody’s business, either. LG has seemingly figured out a way to get good battery life out of a phone with a QHD display — with the G3 beating all of this year’s flagship Android phones with 1080p displays. Apple could likely find a way to do this, too.

The same source who suggests the GHD display for the iPhone 6 also claims that the iPhone 6 images leaked on Weibo last week are not — as had previously been reported — mock-ups, but actually authentic iPhone 6 beta models. Apple reportedly recently shipped these beta units to various facilities around the world, including Hong Kong, for testing purposes.

To try and lock down the device, each sample unit can allegedly be easily identified by a set of “unique particularities, which would explain why the handset hasn’t been leaked more extensively than it has already.

Particularly given that Apple is taking steps to crack down on such leaks in recent times.

  • Snorre Milde

    No.

    …and next week you’ll be claiming that Apple has encountered production difficulties and that the Quad HD iPhone won’t be ready in time for September, or that your “scoop” caused Apple to kill the feature.

    Get real, guys. You may be getting page views now, but you’re destroying your brand for the future.

    • Dan

      I, 2nd that. Apple has been behind the game against Android phones for a while. That don’t make drastic changes like that so quickly. They plan them out to well. If it is a QHD display then someone finally gotta clue, and we all will be very thankful for it.

  • Grunt_at_the_Point

    Luke are you saying the LG G3 has a stunning display?

  • Marc Plus

    There’s plenty of signs in the XCode 6 Beta and iOS 8 that Apple wants devs to be prepared to support new resolutions

    But there’s NOTHING in XCode 6, iOS 8 and WWDC sessions that indicated that PPI on new devices could be over 326PPI, which would make things much more complicated as it would require new bitmap assets and resizing all the buttons, touch targets and UI elements so they don’t get too small (Auto-Layout APIs deals with resolution, not screen density)..

    Anyone expecting the iPhone 6 to have more than 326PPI will likely be disapointed.

  • AAPL_@_$101_Is_A_Done_Deal_:)

    So now Apple is going to be required to have a QuadHD display on the iPhone because LG offers them on the G3 and if the iPhone doesn’t have it, they’ll say Apple is falling behind. Same old BS. LG can do anything they want and if they want to incur costs that aren’t necessary, that’s fine for them. More pixels require more battery power and more graphics power to push those pixels. A smartphone isn’t necessarily going to be used as a HD video player, so unless LG is able to hold costs down on those displays, they may be going a bit overboard. If LG wants to engage in a specs war, that’s entirely up to them. In the end, the financial books need to be balanced and each company knows what they need to do to achieve those numbers. The iPhone 6 is going to sell in huge numbers even without a QHD display. If I had a choice between higher display resolution and greater battery life, I’d go for the battery life every time.

    • Steve__S

      It’s funny to watch current phone vendors race to where the puck has been rather than to where it’s going. The moment devices went Retina, the race was over. Exceeding the human eye’s ability to resolve detail doesn’t make for a better device. It just makes for slower graphics and heavier battery drain. I’d lose respect for Apple if they followed the lead of some of these stupid companies.

      • Thomas DM

        “Exceeding the human eye’s ability to resolve detail doesn’t make for a better device.” : I agree with that. However, I for one do not find 326ppi to be high enough on a smartphone. Just take a good look at iOS 7 and the thinner stroke icons it features and you’ll find some of them to be not so well rendered after all. The rounded corners of the battery icon and the circles of the Control Center are a good example of that.

        Going with Quad HD on a 4.7″ display sounds ridiculous and overkill.
        But pixel density need to be higher than it is today.

      • Steve__S

        My comments make several assumptions… First, I’m assuming 20/20 vision. Second, I’m assuming normal viewing distance. I can provide the math if you like, but at 326 ppi, assuming 20/20 vision, there is no benefit of increasing resolution at a distance of 10.5″ or further. Now, if hold your phone closer and are able to focus on that, great. But for the masses, there is no benefit.
        There are other caveats as well… the Pentile based displays which are used on many Android based Amoled screens need higher resolutions in order to achieve the same level of sharpness, but that’s entirely due to the pilxel arrangement of the lesser screen quality.

  • fustian24

    There’s method to this madness. Apple is trying to construct a world in which your phone is your PC. You use the small screen for mobile phone stuff, but use a 4K monitor in your office and the 4K video is streamed. This gives you a large desktop in which multi-touch works just fine for content creation.

    This is the point of the A7/A8/… and the point of 4K and the point of vector-based icons instead of pixmaps, and the point of this functionality where your phone talks to your Mac screen.

    All pieces of the same puzzle. You phone will be your computer.

About the author

Luke DormehlLuke Dormehl is a UK-based journalist and author, with a background working in documentary film for Channel 4 and the BBC. He is the author of The Formula: How Algorithms Solve All Our Problems, And Create More and The Apple Revolution, both published by Penguin/Random House. His tech writing has also appeared in Wired, Fast Company, Techmeme, and other publications. He'd like you a lot if you followed him on Twitter.

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