Apple Forced To Change Retina MacBook Pro Slogan In Wake Of Google’s Pixel Chromebook

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When the MacBook Pro with Retina Display first came out, it could make a fair claim towards being “the highest-resolution notebook ever.”

Now that Google has unveiled the Pixel, a $1,300 Chromebook that does nothing but run a browser but boasts an even more pixel-dense 12.85-inch display than the MacBook Pro, though, Apple has had to change their slogan.

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The MacBook Pro with Retina Display is no longer the “highest-resolution notebook ever.” It’s now “High performance [that] has never been so well defined.” Not as strong, but with the price of the 13-inch Retina MBP only $200 higher than the Pixel (and capable of doing infinitely more tasks), I doubt the weaker slogan will impact sales.

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  • daov2a

    I’m not a huge fan of Chromebooks but the phrase “capable of doing infinitely more tasks” is untrue and certainly an opinion masquerading as fact. I’m not sure what the Chromebook cannot do that would be missed out on with a rMBP13. The Chromebook is quite capable of any task needing to be performed. Plus, with a touch screen and the ability to install any flavor of Linux and Android, I would say the Chromebook wins in my book. The only difference, to me, is RAM and HDD size, which is no big deal as you get 1TB of online storage for free and 4GB is quite enough for a browser based OS.

  • chengiskhan

    I do not see anyone forced to concede. It take courage to say, I am the second best.

  • Nickm717

    I’m not sure what the Chromebook cannot do that would be missed out on with a rMBP13. The Chromebook is quite capable of any task needing to be performed.

    That comment couldn’t be more wrong. Almost no software can be run on the Pixel. Software people use in their everyday life. Adobe software is the major one for sure. A high resolution laptop display is often marketed toward design professionals but no designer in their right mind would even consider a Chromebook. It is has no audience. Who needs a high resolution Chromebook? I thought Chromebooks were marketed as simple, easy to use and affordable computers? This goes against everything. I do not understand the necessity for this device running this operating system.

  • Steven Quan

    I’m not a huge fan of Chromebooks but the phrase “capable of doing infinitely more tasks” is untrue and certainly an opinion masquerading as fact. I’m not sure what the Chromebook cannot do that would be missed out on with a rMBP13. The Chromebook is quite capable of any task needing to be performed.

    I shouldn’t be feeding the troll but I can’t resist. Let’s see you run full version of Microsoft Office on your Pixel, and while you’re doing that let’s see you run full Adobe Suite with Photoshop, After Effects and the rest of the package. Then let’s see you edit a video using any video editor of your choice. Mac’s have the best video editing softwares in the world in my opinion (see Final Cut), there is no Windows or Linux equivalent for iMovie.

    By the way, you can run all above softwares on a Macbook Pro, either directly on the Mac itself or using Parallels VM running Windows.

  • Designkai

    Why did you add “[that]” when writing out the slogan?

  • felixwcf

    A $1300 Chromebook
    1. Has buggy and unstable but not “full” OS.
    2. Cannot install PC-graded software.
    3. Cannot install PC-graded games and Steam.
    4. Browser lag while watching HD Flash.

    and you tell me it is as powerful as Retina Macbook Pro? Please.. if you want to be a fanboy or hater, be a smart one instead of being an idiot.

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John BrownleeJohn Brownlee is a Contributing Editor. He has also written for Wired, Playboy, Boing Boing, Popular Mechanics, VentureBeat, and Gizmodo. He lives in Boston with his wife and two parakeets. You can follow him here on Twitter.

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