Apple seeks tariff waivers for key product lines

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A future Apple Watch might be able to alert you that you’re breathing poison.
Apple wants relief from Trump's tariffs on Apple Watch and other products imported from China.
Photo: Leander Kahney/Cult of Mac

Apple requested exemptions for the import taxes it must pay when bringing many of its products from China. Currently, the Trump administration levies these on Apple Watch, AirPods, iMac and more.

These tariffs went into place in September as Apple got caught up in President Donald Trump’s trade war with China.

Former Apple designer responds to Trump’s iPhone critique

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Apple shares suffer biggest decline since August
Trump: Not a fan of Apple's decision to ditch the Home button, apparently.
Photo: White House

As an iPhone UI designer, you need to have a thick skin. First, you have to defend your idea internally at Apple. Then members of the public endlessly critique your work upon its release. The one thing you probably don’t expect, though? For the president of the United States to slam your painstaking creation.

That’s exactly what happened to former Apple user interface prototyping team member Linda Dong. In a Sunday tweet, she commented on President Donald Trump’s recent declaration about the iPhone X interface.

Trump admits his tariffs could give Samsung an advantage over Apple

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Apple shares suffer biggest decline since August
Apple CEO Tim Cook and President Donald Trump appear to have a good working relationship.
Photo: White House

During a Friday-night dinner with Donald Trump, Apple CEO Tim Cook very nearly convinced the president that import taxes planned for iPhone and other products would benefit Samsung.

Apple will pay proposed tariffs on products imported from China, while Korea-based Samsung — Cupertino’s chief competitor — will not.

Trump tariffs could drop iPhone sales 20%

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iPhone 11R and 11 Max on wooden railing
Demand for the iPhone 11 could drop significantly if Apple raises its cost to offset new import taxes imposed by Pres. Trump.
Photo: Ian Fuchs/Cult of Mac

No matter what President Trump keeps insisting, his upcoming tariffs on all Apple products will be paid for either by the company or by Americans who buy iPhones, iPads and Macs.

A market-analysis firm warns that If Apple chooses to pass the cost of these import taxes onto its customers, sales of iPhone could drop 20%.

Trump slaps 10% tariff on iPhone imports from China

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No, Donald Trump didn’t open Mac Pro factory yesterday
Trump may have just raised the price of the 2019 iPhone.
Photo: Gage Skidmore/Flickr CC

The iPhone is about to be caught in President Trump’s trade war with China. A month from today, the US will begin charging a 10% tax to import iPhone, iPad, and other devices. They are part of $300 billion dollars worth of imports getting new tariffs.

Trump’s decision caused a 2.0% drop in Apple’s share price.

Trump: Apple won’t receive special treatment for Mac Pro parts

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Mac Pro cheese grater
Trump calls for homemade components instead.
Photo: Apple

President Donald Trump said Friday that Apple will not receive special treatment for Mac Pro components made in China.

Apple submitted multiple requests asking the Trump administration to exclude certain Mac Pro parts from a 25% import tariff. But Trump says the U.S. government will not extend any special waivers or relief to Cupertino.

“Make them in the USA,” Trump tweeted.

Apple asks Trump administration to spare Mac Pro parts from tariffs

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Macpro
The Mac Pro is an expensive beast.
Photo: Apple

Apple submitted multiple requests to the Trump administration asking that the government exclude Mac Pro parts from a 25% import tariff.

Production of the Mac Pro moved to China this year as Apple moves on from the “trash can” Mac Pro design manufactured in Austin, Texas. In nearly all 15 of its filings, Apple says there are no other sources for the proprietary, Apple-designed components.

Trump can’t block protesters from his Twitter, court says

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President Trump Twitter
Pres. Trump’s Twitter account can’t be just praise. He has to accept criticism too.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

A federal appeals court ruled today that President Donald Trump can’t block dissenters from posting replies to his Twitter account.

This upholds an earlier ruling that Trump’s account is a public forum, and therefore preventing anyone from speaking is a violation of the First Amendment to the Constitution