The best maintenance, spring reverb and Apple Card statement apps this week

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app roundup
Lots of nice dark app interfaces for your this week.
Photo: Cult of Mac

This week we trim our SSDs, make PDF statements from our Apple Cards, and drown everything in delicious, springy reverb. These are the apps that got us buzzing this week.

CSV.WTF

A spreadsheet.
A spreadsheet.
Photo: Apple

CSV.WTF is a browser-based tool that turns your Apple Card statements into proper PDF statements, the kind that your accountant can work with.

The tool works locally on your computer, not on a server somewhere. “It respects your privacy and converts statements locally, in your web browser, so that your personal information never leaves your device,” developer Jed Schmidt told Cult of Mac.

Price: Free

Download: CSV.WTF from the App Store (macOS)

Sensei

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Sensei is a Mac app that tells you everything you might want to know about your computer. Several other tools do this, including some that come built-in with your Mac. However, Sensei offers more features than you could need, and looks lovely. It serves up reports on battery and disk status, fan controls, CPU and GPU use, and way more. There’s also a trim enabler for SSDs. I tried enabling trim once, from the command line, and it screwed up a brand new SSD and all its data, so make sure you read up on SSD trim before using it.

Price: $29 per year

Download: Sensei (macOS)

Eventide Spring Reverb

Eventide spring reverb

Old guitar amp designs have an actual metal spring inside them, which is used to generate reverb sounds. It’s the sound of surf music, and of dub. Eventide’s Spring Reverb algorithm, already available in hardware pedal form, offers one of the best digital re-creations of old-school spring reverb, and now it’s on iOS for just $9.99. Plus, it’s an audio unit, so you can use it as a plugin in other apps.

Price: $9.99

Download: Spring Reverb from the App Store (iOS)