This dandy dongle isn’t real but maybe it should be

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USB-C dongle
Apple Dongle lets you connect with a good joke by Ryan Geraghty.
Photo: Ryan Geraghty

Dongles for this, dongles for that, USB-C dongles be damned. Product designer Ryan Geraghty feels your frustration and has created a concept designed to make Apple users laugh about their begrudged move to USB-C.

His idea of an Apple Dongle is “one elegant tapestry of connectivity” featuring 16 adapters into a single USB-C connector.

USB-C is the new standard and many tech companies are adding C ports to their computers and other devices. Apple has done so by doing away with other standard ports, forcing users to buy hubs, adaptors, and dongles to plug in peripheral devices.

USB-C connectors have numerous benefits in transmitting both data and power and is considered truly universal. It is, however, still new which means living with adaptors for various connections.

USB-C dongle resembles a certain sea creature

Apparently, Geraghty is a bit hassled by this.

“Trying to support each of these inputs individually could run you upwards of $857, which is quite a hefty price tag to continue to use products you’ve already paid for,” the mock brochure for Apple Dongle says. “Dongle is not only a more fully-featured product, but it will also retail at a much more approachable $400.”

The brochure has a few disclaimers, calling Dongle a computer-aided design modeling exercise as well as jabs at Apple that come from a place of admiration for the tech giant.

USB-C dongle
It’s all there – HDMI, VGA, SD drive, headphone jack, 30-pin and more.
Photo: Ryan Geraghty

Geraghty’s vision of Dongle looks like an octopus (or two) with connectors for Ethernet, Firewire, SD Card, Micro SD card, HDMI, VGA, headphones, regular USB and 30-pin to name just a few.

“No longer suffer through the awkward trial and error, praying to eventually find the adapter with the right pairing of input and output,” the brochure reads.

Geraghty is a senior product designer for the Fossil Group in San Francisco and has designed smartwatches for a number of global brands, according to his resume.