The Apple Store’s Secret Strategy To Get You To Touch (And Buy) Its Laptops

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appleangle

Apple’s attention to detail, its subtle understanding of the way we interact with our machines, just never ceases to amaze. Case in point: did you know that Apple precisely angles all of the screens on its Apple Store display units to encourage you to walk up and touch them? It’s true!

In a post over at Forbes, Carmine Gallo explains how Apple Store employees precisely angle notebooks to the same angle (using an app called Simply Angle). Why? Not because it’s the perfect angle for seeing what’s on the screen, but for exactly opposite reasons!

The Apple Store pays attention to every detail. You might think that Apple positions all its notebook computers for aesthetic reasons. That’s partly true. The tables are uncluttered and the products are clean. But the main reason notebook computers screens are slightly angled is to encourage customers to adjust the screen to their ideal viewing angle—in other words, to touch the computer! It’s also why all computers and iPads in the Apple Store are loaded with apps and software and connected to the Internet. Apple wants you to see the display for yourself and to experiment with apps and web sites to experience the power and performance of the devices. Customers in an Apple Retail Store can spend all the time they want playing with the devices and using the Internet—nobody will pressure them to leave.

Brilliant. And it works. Go in to an Apple Store and check out the new MacBook Pro to see.

Source: Forbes

  • joewaylo

    Apple hasn’t made me “Touch (And Buy)” their laptops yet. It could be the $999 price tag scares me. $199-$499 are more reasonable.

  • Shane Bryson

    Apple hasn’t made me “Touch (And Buy)” their laptops yet. It could be the $999 price tag scares me. $199-$499 are more reasonable.

    That’s a more reason price if you want a plastic piece of junk you will be replacing in 2 years. I would rather pay the money for a quality product that will last me around5 or 6 years.

  • Solowalker

    Apple hasn’t made me “Touch (And Buy)” their laptops yet. It could be the $999 price tag scares me. $199-$499 are more reasonable.

    Apple hasn’t made me “Touch (And Buy)” their laptops yet. It could be the $999 price tag scares me. $199-$499 are more reasonable.

    That’s a more reason price if you want a plastic piece of junk you will be replacing in 2 years. I would rather pay the money for a quality product that will last me around5 or 6 years.

    Quite true. You have to consider them an investment. Also after the initial buy of one Apple laptop you can keep them for 2-3 years and resell them for on average about 70% of their value, in my experience. You can then take that money and go buy a new one. Rinse and repeat. So after the initial $1000 purchase, every subsequent purchase only costs a net $199-$499. So you buy your cheap thing, I buy a Mac. We both buy a new one at about the same time, but mine is by choice just to have the latest (and constant warranty coverage) and yours is because your cheap thing is either broken or works like crap.

    Again, this is from first-hand personal experience. One friend I have had to buy no less than 3 machines during the same period I owned my last MacBook Pro. She’s already told me her next machine will be a Mac.
  • Solowalker

    This actually is quite brilliant. I bet whoever thought this up got a raise.

  • tukhtaev

    Honestly speaking it is not true. When I visited Apple Store in London in 2009 while I was international student, the genius asked me stop playing with macbook (aluminum unibody), cuz there was a real customer who wanted to buy one. The day before my visit to Apple Store my Sony Vaio suddenly died, so next morning I went to Apple Store and I received that type of treatment. I was very disappointed. Maybe I should have shown my wallet with lots of cash. So I left the store. The next day I have booked via online my turn for genius bar and then I told them that I wanted to buy macbook. Unfortunately that stupid genius guy who worked there made a wrong assumption about me, which is very unfriendly towards the customers.