No, Microsoft Didn’t Bring Halo 4 To iOS – This $4.99 Scam Is A Game Of Chess

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Halo-4-App-Store-scam

While Apple has managed to keep the App Store free from malware, it seems the Cupertino company has a hard time filtering out scams. Every so often, a shameless developer tries their luck at selling a title that promises to be something it isn’t. The latest claims to be a Halo 4 clone that is “iPhone/iPad exclusive.” They’ve gone through the trouble of writing a lengthy App Store description in an effort to fool you into thinking it’s the real thing. But in reality, it’s just a $4.99 game of chess.

IntelliScreenX Scam Hits The App Store And Should Be Avoided At All Costs

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Fake.
Fake.

Every so often, an iOS developer attempts to make a quick buck by creating a simple app, naming it after a hugely popular jailbreak tweak, then releasing it in the App Store with the same logo and screenshots. That’s exactly what JB Solutions has done with IntelliScreenX, a $0.99 app that promises to be the ultimate notification center for your lock screen. In reality, it’s nothing more than a nasty alarm clock.

Is MacKeeper Really A Scam?

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mackeeper_promo
MacKeeper gets a bad rap, but what's really behind the controversy?

MacKeeper is a strange piece of software. There may be no other app as controversial in the Apple world. The application, which performs various janitorial duties on your hard drive, is loathed by a large segment of the Mac community. Check out any blog, site or forum that mentions it, and you’ll find hundreds of furious comments condemning MacKeeper and Zeobit, the company behind it. We discovered this ourselves earlier this month, when we offered a 50%-off deal on MacKeeper. Look at all those furious comments on the post.

The complaints about MacKeeper are all over the shop: It’s a virus. It holds your machine hostage until you pay up. It can’t be completely removed if you decide to delete it. Instead of speeding up your computer, it slows it down. It erases your hard drive, deletes photos, and disappears documents. There are protests about MacKeeper’s annual subscription fees. Zeobit is slammed for seedy marketing tactics. It runs pop-under ads, plants sock-puppet reviews and encourages sleazy affiliate sites, critics say.

But what’s really strange is that MacKeeper has been almost universally praised by professional reviewers. All week I’ve been checking out reviews on the Web and I can’t find a bad one.

Bargain Hunters Spend $4,700 On Potatoes, Cans Of Coke Disguised As iPhones & Laptops

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Don't buy iPhones from people in the street, because they probably aren't iPhones.
Don't buy iPhones from people in the street, because they probably aren't iPhones.

A gang of con men in Manchester, England, have managed to scam unsuspecting customers out of over £3,000 (approx. $4,700) since February by selling bottles of water, cans of Coke, and bags of potatoes which they claim to be iPhones and laptops. In some cases they are taking £1,400 (approx. $2,200) per transaction.

$4.99 iOS 5 Battery Fix Available From Cydia Is A Complete Scam

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Is this a familiar sight for your iPhone 5?
Is this a familiar sight for your iPhone 5?

While Apple has been slow to fix the battery issues plaguing its new iPhone 4S and other devices running the new iOS 5 software, it seemed the jailbreaking community had come to the rescue. A tweak that hit Cydia earlier this week claims to fix your battery life woes under iOS 5, but it wants $4.99 for the privilege.

As it turns out, the tweak does nothing; it’s just a complete scam to steal your cash.

Facebook Scam Has Already Claimed 21,000 Victims by Exploiting Steve Jobs’ Death

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Screen Shot 2011-10-06 at 3.55.54 PM

Scammers have already taken to Facebook to exploit the death of Steve Jobs. PandaLabs has “detected a malicious link” on Facebook that was making the rounds earlier and claiming victims.

The page was called “R.I.P. Steve Jobs” and a link on the page claimed that 50 free iPads were being given away “in memory of Steve Jobs.” This was obviously a scam, but it seems that over 21,000 Facebook users have already been infected by the malware.

Missing iTunes Store Credit? Thank the Towson Hack [Scams]

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iTunes downloads have fallen on hard times. Except for the App Store, of course. Photo: Apple
iTunes downloads have fallen on hard times. Except for the App Store, of course. Photo: Apple

An article on Macworld today sheds some light on the Towson Hack — a mysterious scam involving stolen iTunes store credit dating back to November of last year.

Macworld highlights a trafficked thread on the Apple support forums that tells story after story of stolen iTunes gift card credit, initially relating to a changed billing address to Towson, Maryland.