Apple’s Official iOS 7 Adoption Numbers Make Android Look Absolutely Pathetic

ios7-vs-ios6

Many of the stats we have about iOS marketshare and demographics come from third-party companies, most of whom are tracking ad impressions within their network. As such, their stats have the potential of being inaccurate, and need to be taken with at least a little bit of salt.

Looks like online ad network Chitika can be trusted though. Earlier this week, we reported that Chitika was now tracking 74.1% of all devices as running iOS 7. Now, Apple is backing those numbers up, and it makes Google look pathetic.

According to a new update on Apple’s developer website, iOS 7 is now running on 74% of all iOS devices… a remarkably quick upgrade rate for an operating system that is less than three months old.

The runner-up, of course, is iOS 6, which is running on a distant 22% of all iOS devices. That makes sense, as while everything from the iPhone 4 on can run iOS 7, iOS 6 was the last version of iOS to support devices released before Apple’s A4 processor debuted in the iPhone 4, as well as the first-generation iPad.

Again, this is official data, coming directly from Apple, so it can definitely be trusted. It’s amazing how closely it tracks to Chitika’s numbers, which show that a full 96% of all iOS devices in the wild are running an operating system released by Apple within the last fifteen months.

Is there really even a point in comparing these numbers to Android? No, but I will anyway: compared to iOS 7’s 94% adoption rate, the latest version of Android, KitKat, is currently running on a pathetic 1.1% of devices.

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  • Market_Mayhem

    Wall Street doesn’t care about uniformity of a platform or anything else once the device is sold. All that matters is huge amounts of market share. Whether devices get upgraded or not is of no concern. It’s obvious the more Android manufacturers, carriers and various devices sold, the harder and longer it will be to upgrade all those devices. It’s just seen as being an acceptable trade off for having high market share.

  • johnc19609

    Point of clarification, the original iPad can only be updated to iOS 5.

  • kevin13769

    Wall Street doesn’t care about uniformity of a platform or anything else once the device is sold. All that matters is huge amounts of market share. Whether devices get upgraded or not is of no concern. It’s obvious the more Android manufacturers, carriers and various devices sold, the harder and longer it will be to upgrade all those devices. It’s just seen as being an acceptable trade off for having high market share.

    I think the point is, is that the users of these phones have an obsolete phone that cannot be upgraded, so security issues don’t get dealt with, which does concern a lot of people, and as time moves on, sensible people will address this issue by either not having a smart phone or will have a smart phone that updates when needed rather than waiting for the service provider to approve and then push out an upgrade which is over 6 months if at all…

    Personally i love the fact that my phone is as secure as it could be, and i don’t have to worry that if something comes out making it liable to attacks it will be sorted within weeks if not days…!!! That is not to say i discount Android as an unusable platform, but security is important with a device of this type, and i for one, don’t give a crap what wall street thinks, they can do what they want, i will always buy the best device for my needs, and that is NOT android with there outdated unserviceable way of doing things…

    It’s just a shame that there are only 2 real choices these days, i would love for BB and Microsoft to pull there fingers out and get it right to have more choice…

  • MrsCleaver

    “… Make Android Look Absolutely Pathetic”

    As indeed, it is.

  • krleitch

    The article doesn’t make a fair comparison. KitKat was just released 5 weeks ago; you can’t compare with 15 months of iOS releases. About 75% now run v4.0 and up. Not bad for an OS that is given away and installed on the vast majority of mobile devices from a wide number of OEMs. I have moved to devices that get the updates right away, such as the Nexus line and my developer edition of the HTC One. All are running KitKat now. Google is wisely moving more apps out of the core OS to make it run in a smaller footprint (512 MB) and to make updates easier. The final stage is set. All markets move toward three to four main competitors. Blackberry is dead in the eye of the consumer. It’s just Google, Apple, and Microsoft. Expect Google and Microsoft to move closer to the Apple model, since it does work, in all fairness. Google and Microsoft will be somewhat more open than Apple, but they will improve quality and updates to be closer to that of the Apple model. Being a libertarian type, I thoroughly dislike the inflexibility and hand-holding of Apple since I value my freedom more.

  • ZionzHill

    This is bogus, the majority of Android Devices have completely Different Skins so even if every android device had 4.4 today, they would still be vastly different in the function and features because HTC, Samsung ,LG and other companies create their own Roms, where is ios 7 is exactly the same experience.

    Not everyone is going to get the Nexus function and Features, and frankly not everyone likes Nexus Devices or Vanilla Android. Fragmentation is honestly a non issue for the majority of Android users unless your android device is super old and a very cheap low end device purchased on a prepaid carrier. Also btw ios 7 runs horribly on my wives ipad mini talk about lag city as well as every person I know with a 4 or 4s has major issues with ios 7.

    Also a vast larger majority of Android users root their phones or use launchers to give them the look feel and function they want wether its the latest version of android or their own personal flare, Nova Launcher Prime and Titanium Backup (which is a root only app) are in the top 10 Paid apps in the entire play store, which tells me many many user root their phones as well as use Launchers and with Launchers and with the customization power Launchers offer fragmentation is a non issue especially when the skin they have isn’t even vanilla android.

    This is just typical apple fan boys trying to make them feel better about their mediocre devices.

  • Paul Burt

    This is bogus, the majority of Android Devices have completely Different Skins so even if every android device had 4.4 today, they would still be vastly different in the function and features because HTC, Samsung ,LG and other companies create their own Roms, where is ios 7 is exactly the same experience.

    Not everyone is going to get the Nexus function and Features, and frankly not everyone likes Nexus Devices or Vanilla Android. Fragmentation is honestly a non issue for the majority of Android users unless your android device is super old and a very cheap low end device purchased on a prepaid carrier. Also btw ios 7 runs horribly on my wives ipad mini talk about lag city as well as every person I know with a 4 or 4s has major issues with ios 7.

    Also a vast larger majority of Android users root their phones or use launchers to give them the look feel and function they want wether its the latest version of android or their own personal flare, Nova Launcher Prime and Titanium Backup (which is a root only app) are in the top 10 Paid apps in the entire play store, which tells me many many user root their phones as well as use Launchers and with Launchers and with the customization power Launchers offer fragmentation is a non issue especially when the skin they have isn’t even vanilla android.

    This is just typical apple fan boys trying to make them feel better about their mediocre devices.

    Typical fandroid comment.

    Newsflash: rooting is not done by a “vast majority” of Android users and your “evidence” is anything but that. Fragmentation is a huge Android issue and these numbers prove how badly Apple is beating Google.

    But you’ll keep think you’re right, regardless of the massive evidence against you. Typical blind, fanboy allegiances.

  • Paul Burt

    The article doesn’t make a fair comparison. KitKat was just released 5 weeks ago; you can’t compare with 15 months of iOS releases. About 75% now run v4.0 and up. Not bad for an OS that is given away and installed on the vast majority of mobile devices from a wide number of OEMs. I have moved to devices that get the updates right away, such as the Nexus line and my developer edition of the HTC One. All are running KitKat now. Google is wisely moving more apps out of the core OS to make it run in a smaller footprint (512 MB) and to make updates easier. The final stage is set. All markets move toward three to four main competitors. Blackberry is dead in the eye of the consumer. It’s just Google, Apple, and Microsoft. Expect Google and Microsoft to move closer to the Apple model, since it does work, in all fairness. Google and Microsoft will be somewhat more open than Apple, but they will improve quality and updates to be closer to that of the Apple model. Being a libertarian type, I thoroughly dislike the inflexibility and hand-holding of Apple since I value my freedom more.

    There was a little typo in his comparison, but the numbers still support his claim. Even comparing iOS 7 to devices with Android 4.3+ (4.3 was released before iOS 7), iOS 7 still comes out WAY ahead. Giving away the OS has nothing to do with adoption rates because Google can’t control the OEMs and carriers that get to screw with Android BECAUSE it is open. Google won’t be able to match Apple’s model completely unless they actively make more changes to how they push updates to devices. Even Nexus devices don’t all get updated at the same time. Microsoft can do it now that Nokia is under their wing. Google can’t have Android the way it is and update all devices the way Apple does; it just won’t ever happen.

  • TheMacGuy

    “iOS 6 was the last version of iOS to support devices released before Apple’s A4 processor debuted in the iPhone 4, as well as the first-generation iPad.”

    No, why does everyone at Cult Of Mac get this wrong. The first-gen iPad was DROPPED with iOS 6. The last version of iOS it is able to run is 5.1.1. And remember, iPad 1st Gen did have the A4, it debuted with the iPad. So it should be “iOS 6 was the last version of iOS to support iPhones released before Apple’s A4 processor”. iOS 6 didn’t support the 3rd Gen iPod touch either, which had a Samsung ARM chip. So the only non-A series powered iDevice that was support by iOS 6 was the iPhone 3GS.

    Also btw ios 7 runs horribly on my wives ipad mini talk about lag city as well as every person I know with a 4 or 4s has major issues with ios 7.

    Has your wife tried closing all apps and rebooting the iPad? I’m running iOS 7.0.3 on my personal iPad mini 1st Gen and its not “lag city”. It actually runs fairly well. I do wish it have more RAM though. I did notice, however, friends with iPhone 4′s running iOS 7 are quite laggy compared to my iPhone 5, I can’t deny that. Now, I haven’t had much experience with iOS 7 and iPhone 4Ses, so I can’t comment on that.

    This is just typical apple fan boys trying to make them feel better about their mediocre devices.

    So thats why you typed out that long comment to protect the Android install base? To make your self feel better about you cheap plastic phones? And I doubt most people root their phones, as most people who buy an Android phone are people who are looking for a cheap smartphone. Most Android users probably hear “root” and think of a tree. You may try to deny it and say all Android users are geeks, but I hate to tell you that is not the case.

  • eestes1

    I think that there is a bit of a difference on how Google goes about updating Android handsets vs. Apple that you skipped past:

    http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2013/09/balky-carriers-and-slow-oems-step-aside-google-is-defragging-android/

    To deal with the slow Carriers and Manufacturers Google has stripped out a lot of functionality from the core OS and moved it to their Google Play Services .

    “This year’s Google I/O was a show of force for this new delivery concept. No new Android version was at the show, yet Google announced Google Hangouts, Google Play Games, cloud saving of game and app data, a complete redesign of Google Play Music and Google Maps, a new version of the Google Maps API, and new location and activity recognition APIs. Post I/O, we’ve seen seemingly OS-level features added like the Android Device Manager, a remote wipe and device tracking system, without needing to touch the base OS.”

    Google finally got Google Play Services to a mature state and that allows them to push major functionality updates out without “OS” updates. So many users will not have KitKat but that does not mean they don’t have the latest updates for the lion share of apps which gives them most of the functionality updates when coupled with a “Services” update. That is very different from Apple who hangs its hat on the major OS rollout every year. Google likes a lighter OS that acts as a framework and then uses the services app to make enhancements.

    All the people I know who have android handsets do not feel they are missing anything from not running the latest and greatest Android OS software. Obviously hardware is a different issue.

    So to say that the number is “pathetic” reveals a major lack of understanding on how Google has positioned functionality updates. You’d really need to look at the numbers for what handsets have updated to the latest Google Play Services version.

About the author

John BrownleeJohn Brownlee is a Contributing Editor. He has also written for Wired, Playboy, Boing Boing, Popular Mechanics, VentureBeat, and Gizmodo. He lives in Boston with his wife and two parakeets. You can follow him here on Twitter.

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