Today in Apple history: Apple’s ‘unreleased’ Mac OS ships to devs

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Remember Mac OS Copland? Probably not from using it.
Remember Mac OS Copland? Probably not from using it.
Image: Apple/Cult of Mac/Ste Smith

November 17: Today in Apple history: Mac OS Copland November 17, 1995: Apple releases the first beta version of its new Copland operating system to around 50 Mac developers.

Not so much a Mac OS update as a totally new operating system, it offers next-gen features and promises to help Apple take on the then-mighty Windows 95. Sadly, it will never reach the public.

Today in Apple history: Cupertino salivates over the restaurant biz

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Apple Cafes were set to sweep the world. They didn't.
Photo: Apple/Mega Bytes International

November 12: Today in Apple history: Apple Cafes November 12, 1996: Apple lays out a wild plan to get into the restaurant business, saying it will open a chain of Apple Cafes.

A bit like Apple Stores without the computers and iPhones for sale, the restaurants would open in cities all around the world. The first, Apple says, will be a 15,000-square-foot restaurant in Los Angeles, opening in late 1997.

None of this winds up happening.

Today in Apple history: Gil Amelio joins Apple’s board

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Bringing on Gil Amelio was viewed as a big coup for the Apple board.
Bringing on Gil Amelio was viewed as a big coup for the Apple board.
Photo: Apple

November 9: Today in Apple history: Gil Amelio joins Apple board of directors November 9, 1994: Gil Amelio, a businessman with a reputation as a talented turnaround artist, joins Apple’s board.

Coming off his impressive revitalization of National Semiconductor and Rockwell International, Amelio’s appointment at Apple sparks widespread celebration. Many Apple watchers think his arrival means the company’s dark days are over.

Sadly, Amelio’s turnaround tricks won’t work in Cupertino.

Today in Apple history: Newton MessagePad makes its last stand

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The Newton MessagePad 2100 was the last hurrah for Apple's Newton line.
The MessagePad 2100 was the last hurrah for Apple's Newton line.
Photo: Moparx

November 7: Today in Apple history Newton MessagePad November 7, 1997: Apple releases the Newton MessagePad 2100, the last and best iteration of the company’s early line of handheld devices.

Among its improvements over previous generations, the MessagePad 2100 packs expanded memory, enhanced speed, and upgraded communications software. Nevertheless, the Newton’s fate is sealed: It will be scrapped by Steve Jobs, who has just returned to Apple, within months.

Today in Apple history: Apple begins retail venture inside CompUSA

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Desiring more control over how Macs got sold, Apple turned to CompUSA.
Desiring more control over how Macs got sold, Apple turned to CompUSA.
Photo: Coolcaesar/Wikipedia CC

November 4: Today in Apple history: Apple CompUSA November 4, 1997: Apple unveils its plan to open small “store within a store” sections inside CompUSA outlets around the United States.

In a step toward the flagship Apple stores that would launch four years later, Cupertino-trained employees staff these mini-stores. The move gives Apple a bit more control over the way its products get displayed and demoed to consumers.

Today in Apple history: Dell PCs overtake Macs in education market

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eMac
Steve Jobs was accused of failing one of Apple's most popular markets.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

October 27: Today in Apple history October 27, 1999: Dell Computer overtakes Apple in the educational market, stealing Cupertino’s crown as the the top company selling computers to U.S. schools.

Steve Jobs, who is still in the process of rebuilding Apple after its near-collapse in the 1990s, faces heavy criticism for ignoring one of the company’s strongest markets.

Today in Apple history: OS 9 is ‘classic Mac’ operating system’s last stand

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Mac OS 9
Do you remember Mac OS 9?
Photo: Developers-Club

October 23: Today in Apple history October 23, 1999: Apple releases Mac OS 9, the last version of the classic Mac operating system before the company makes the leap to OS X a couple years later.

It does not veer far from OS 8 in terms of look and feel. However, OS 9 adds a few nifty features that make it well worth the upgrade.

Today in Apple history: PowerBook 100 series is a smash hit

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The entry-level PowerBook 100 fueled a laptop revolution.
The entry-level PowerBook 100 fueled a laptop revolution.
Photo: Danamania/Wikipedia CC

October 21: Today in Apple history October 21, 1991: Apple launches its PowerBook 100 series, the most important laptops in Apple history — and one of the most important tech gadgets of all time.

These devices almost single-handedly turned notebook computers into a mainstream technology. Apple’s subsequent success in this category — whether it’s the current MacBooks or even the rise of mobile devices like the iPhone — owes a huge debt of gratitude to the PowerBook 100 series.

Today in Apple history: The forgotten first Mac with an internal CD-ROM

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Why did the Mac IIvx fail to take the world by storm?
Why did the Mac IIvx fail to take the world by storm?
Photo: Apple

October 19: Today in Apple history October 19, 1992: Apple launches the Mac IIvx, the first Macintosh computer to ship with a metal case and, more importantly, an internal CD-ROM drive.

The last of the Macintosh II series, the Mac IIvx experiences one of the more notorious price adjustments in Apple history. Within five months of shipping, Apple slashes the computer’s launch price of $2,949 to $1,899. That’s one way to reward early adopters!

Today in Apple history: Performa 6360 is a low-cost multimedia Mac

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The Performa 6320CD Mac delivered a great price-to-performance ratio.
The Performa 6320CD Mac delivered great performance for the price, luring new users.
Photo: Shrine of Apple

October 17: Today in Apple history October 17, 1996: Apple launches its Performa 6360 Mac, sold elsewhere in the world as the Power Macintosh 6300/160.

An impressive multimedia Mac for its time, the Performa 6360 came bundled with a TV/video card. It also let users make phone calls, listen to CDs, and watch television — all of which seemed amazingly futuristic in 1996. As Macs went, it was pretty affordable, too.