Apple takes a hacksaw to trade-in values for used iPhones and more

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Apple takes a hacksaw to estimated trade-in values for its devices
You won't get as much money for your old devices today as you would yesterday.
Photo: Pictures of Money/Flickr CC

Overnight Apple has chopped estimated trade-in values on a variety of products. It means that users will get less money for their old products when they try and trade them in with Apple.

Note to Cupertino: When people talk about wishing that Apple would cut prices on their products, this isn’t what they generally mean!

The biggest trade-in price cut in the U.S. was to Apple’s iPad range. The largest of these was to the iPad mini, which declined 40% from $120 to a maximum of $80. The iPad Air, meanwhile, declined 35% to a maximum of $70. Previously, Apple was willing to pay $100.

The largest iPhone price cut was to the iPhone 7 Plus. Apple will pay up to $150 for traded in handsets. That’s 28% below their previous $200.

The smallest price cuts were to the Apple Watch and Mac lines, which barely declined.

People overseas didn’t get away so easily, however. In Germany a report claims that the MacBook Pro now comes with an upper limit of 690 euros. That’s down from 1,200 euros previously — representing 54% difference.

Why is Apple cutting prices?

Lots of people will inevitably jump on Apple’s seemingly stingy behavior when it comes to cutting prices. If you’re thinking of trading in an old device it’s certainly annoying not to be able to get as much as you could previously. It should go without saying that you’re best off looking around to get quotes before defaulting to Apple as the best place to trade in your device.

However, it’s also important to point out that depreciation plays a big part. An iPhone 7 Plus is now more than three years old, having launched on September 16, 2016. The prices Apple charges will also be affected by the demand for them. Since Apple no longer reveals the unit sales for its products, this is tougher to gauge.

Apple’s new trade-in prices

iPhone:

‌iPhone XS‌ Max –– up to $500 (Previously $600) — Down 18%
‌iPhone XS‌ –– up to $420 (Previously $500) — Down 17%
iPhone XR –– up to $300 (Previously $370) — Down 21%
‌iPhone‌ X –– up to $320 (Previously $400) — Down 22%
iPhone 8 Plus –– up to $250 (Previously $300) — Down 18%
‌iPhone 8‌ –– up to $170 (Previously $220) — Down 25%
‌iPhone‌ 7 Plus –– up to $150 (Previously $200) — Down 28%
‌iPhone‌ 7 –– up to $120 (Previously $150) — Down 22%
‌iPhone‌ 6s Plus –– up to $100 (Previously $120) — Down 18%
‌iPhone‌ 6s –– up to $80 (Previously $100) — Down 22%

iPad:

iPad Pro –– up to $220 (Previously $290) — Down 27%
‌iPad‌ –– up to $100 (Previously $140) — Down 33%
iPad Air –– up to $70 (Previously $100) — Down 35%
‌iPad‌ mini –– up to $80 (Previously $120) — Down 40%

Mac:

‌MacBook Pro‌ –– up to $2,530 (Previously $2,530) — The same
MacBook Air –– up to $660 (Previously $670) — Down 1.50%
MacBook –– up to $610 (Previously $630) — Down 3%
iMac Pro –– up to $4,150 (Previously $4240) — Down 2%
iMac –– up to $1,500 (Previously $1,560) — Down 4%
‌Mac Pro‌ –– up to $1,700 (Previously $1,700) — The same
‌Mac mini‌ –– up to $230 ($230) — The same

Apple Watch:

‌Apple Watch‌ Series 4 –– up to $100 (Previously $110) — Down 10%
‌Apple Watch‌ Series 3 –– up to $70 ($70) — The same
Apple Watch Series 2 –– up to $60 ($60) — The same
‌Apple Watch‌ Series 1 –– up to $30 ($30) — The same

Source: MacRumors