iOS devs rake in $120 billion and just keep going

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iPhone app development can be very profitable, and Apple has a new program to help more women get in the business.
iPhone app development can be very profitable, and Apple has a new program to help more women get in the business.
Photo: Apple

Since the iOS App Store launched in 2008, Apple has paid developers $120 billion. And more than a quarter of that came in the past year alone, according to the iPhone maker.

To increase diversity in software developers making all that money, Apple today opened the first of what will be quarterly Entrepreneur Camps for female-founded app development companies.

A rising tide lifts all boats

Apple takes in 30 percent of the fees iPhone and iPad owners pay for software purchased in the App Store. The rest goes to  the developer, of course. The situation is similar for subscription fees, but with Apple’s share dropping to 15 percent after the first year.

With sales of iPhone leveling off, Apple’s profits depend more on the revenue it takes in from its Services division, which includes the App Store. With the company taking a share of every sale, the more money developers make, the better for Apple.

Entrepreneur Camps focused on women

The new developer camps are two-week immersive hands-on technology labs where participants work one-on-one with Apple experts and engineers. The goal is to help participants take advantage of cutting-edge technologies, including optimizing for the A12 Bionic processor in the newest iPhone and iPad models, integrating Core ML, building new experiences with ARKit and more.

To be admitted to the Entrepreneur Camp program, businesses must be female founded, co-founded or led, and have at least one woman on the product development team. They must also have a working app or prototype.

“We hope that this program helps to inspire women around the world to learn to code, join the iOS development community and share in the thriving app economy,’ said Esther Hare, Apple’s senior director, Worldwide Developer Marketing and executive sponsor, Women@Apple.