iPhones and iPads Are Robbing Us Of Truly Work-Free Vacations

iPhones and iPads Are Robbing Us Of Truly Work-Free Vacations

Using personal iPhones and iPads in the office leads many people to work from them while on vacation.

Our iPhones and iPads, which enable us to work and be on call virtually anywhere at any time, will lead to more than half of us working while on vacation. That’s the result of a new study that looked at how technology impacts the work/life balance. iOS devices are common players in the bring your own device (BYOD) era. As BYOD programs lead many of us to use our personal iOS devices and other mobile technology for work-related tasks, they also encourage an “always on” attitude from employers and employees alike.

The study, commissioned by enterprise remote access vendor TeamViewer, shows that just over half (52%) of professionals expect to work while on vacation in one capacity or another.

It also comes on the heels of a similar study that we reported last week. That study showed that always-connected devices like the iPhone and iPad lead most of us to work well past the end of the business day. A practice so common, in fact, that many of us will work an extra seven hours outside of normal business hours and outside of the office each week.

Apparently, despite that much extra productivity, we may not be able to have even a few days in which work doesn’t find its way to us.

The TeamViewer report profiled 2,200 Americans across various professions. While half said that they expect to work while on vacation, the type of work varied.

Just under one-third (30%) said that they expect to be reading and responding to work-related emails. Nearly a quarter (23%) expect to be fielding work-related phone calls. Beyond those interruptions, 13% of workers said that they expected to need access to work-related documents, files, or network resources because they anticipated being asked by a supervisor, coworker, or client to accomplish work-related tasks while on vacation

The study also found that these expectations weren’t the same for everyone. Men were more likely to work from an iPhone, iPad, or notebook while on vacation than women. Single people were more likely to work than married couples.

Both studies point to the fact that the ubiquity of iOS devices (and other mobile platforms), Wi-Fi, and high-speed network connections like LTE are re-defining what work is and how it fits into our everyday lives.

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  • billsweatt

    The device itself has nothing to do with anything. YOU can choose whether or not to answer the phone. YOU can choose whether to perform “work” while on vacation. This is like that story where the out of control SUV killed a pedestrian. NO. The truck didn’t kill the pedestrian. The driver did that. Don’t blame tools for your behavior.

  • bvankampen

    When I went on vacation a couple of weeks ago I got the OK from my boss to turn off e-mail on my iPhone and iPad (both company property). Definitely let me enjoy my vacation and not worry about work e-mails. Definitely recommend doing this.

About the author

Ryan FaasRyan Faas is a technology journalist and consultant living in upstate New York who has written extensively about Apple, business and enterprise IT, and the mobile industry. In addition to writing for Cult of Mac, he is a contributor to Computerworld, InformIT, and Peachpit Press. In a previous existence he was a healthcare IT director as well as a systems and network administrator. Follow Ryan on Twitter and Google +

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