Apple extends free repair program for 2013-2015 MacBook Pro

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MacBook Pro defective coating
Does your MacBook Pro screen look like this?
Photo: Apple Support

Apple has reportedly extended its free repair program for 2013-2015 MacBook Pro units with anti-reflective coating issues. A leaked internal document reveals the company has now authorized free repairs for four years from the notebook’s original purchase date.

Apple’s first MacBook Pros with Retina displays were some of the finest laptops money could buy at the time, thanks to their super-sharp and brilliantly beautiful displays. But those displays weren’t always perfect.

Some customers discovered that after extended use, the anti-reflective coating on the display cover glass could wear away. The problem became widely reported in early 2015, and Apple eventually launched a free repair program that October to rectify the issue.

Free repairs for everyone

Now that program has been extended, according to MacRumors. Both 13- and 15-inch MacBook Pro units manufactured in 2013, 2014, or 2015 are eligible for a free coating repair for up to four years after the machine’s original purchase date.

These are the notebooks that qualify, and when coverage ends based on the date each one was discontinued:

  • 2013 13-inch MacBook Pro: July 2018
  • 2013 15-inch MacBook Pro: July 2018
  • 2014 13-inch MacBook Pro: March 2019
  • 2014 15-inch MacBook Pro: May 2019
  • 2015 13-inch MacBook Pro: October 2020
  • 2015 15-inch MacBook Pro: Still sold

2012 machines aren’t included in the list since they were discontinued in October 2013, and no longer fall within the four-year eligibility window.

Contact Apple support

If you have an eligible MacBook Pro with an anti-reflective coating issue, you can arrange a free repair by visiting the Genius Bar at your local Apple Store, or an Apple Authorized Service Provider.

If you have already paid for this issue to be rectified by Apple or one of its approved service partners, you may be eligible for a refund. Talk to Apple by contacting its support team.

“Since the repair program has not been publicly announced, some Apple support representatives may be unaware of its existence,” MacRumors warns. “Escalating your request to a senior advisor may help, but your mileage may vary.”

  • Rahxephon

    Meanwhile the early 2008 MacBook Pro, whose GPU had a 100 PERCENT FAILURE RATE, can no longer be repaired or replaced (it was never replaced) in any capacity. Thanks, Apple.

    • Moun

      Or maybe it is time for you to move on and update nearly 10 years later.

      • Rahxephon

        Why should I be punished for a manufacturing defect? Why should I have to stop using a device that runs the newest software and does everything I need it to do? Please, have an actual argument. Materialist consumerism isn’t one.