Multi-sport sensor will help you reach PIQ performance

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Think you have game? PIQ will give you the data to help you prove or improve.
Think you have game? PIQ will give you the data to help you prove or improve.
Photo: PIQ

Cult of Mac CES 2016 full coverageYour god gave you athletic gifts, or so you believe. But don’t listen to yourself or buddies who play alongside you and talk trash about your skills.

PIQ, a multi-sport sensor, can quickly tease out the divine delusion with Earthly performance metrics that, if you’re honest with yourself, can help you improve your game, whether its golf, tennis, skiing or 21 other sports.

The PIQ sensor hopes to peek interest Wednesday at CES in Las Vegas, where developers of the palm-sized device hope to gain traction in the sports wearables market.

Wearable technology is gaining popularity as developers continue to show a skeptical public how smart watches, like the Apple Watch, and other wearables can offer a valuable glimpse into the possibilities – and the limits – of our bodies.

Affordable sensors like PIQ and Zepp, are providing performance data once only accessible to professional athletes training in advanced sports laboratories. Now, heart rate, foot speed and various swing mechanics can be measured and evaluated with sensors that attach to clothing or sports equipment and with help from the video camera and an app on your iPhone or Android device.

Zepp may be PIQ’s biggest competitor with a growing list of pro athlete endorsements, partnerships with sports organizations and equipment manufacturers. Zepp is also at CES and it continues to grow its user base of more than 500,000.

PIQ attaches to your golf glove and tells you things about your swing.
PIQ attaches to your golf glove and tells you things about your swing.
Photo: PIQ

The PIQ sensor uses 13 axis and measures performance metrics like velocity, height, air time, G force, amplitude and trajectory. It quickly gained good reviews by amateur golfers after its launch in June and quickly partnered with companies for tennis (Babolot) and skiing (Rossignol) to develop the apps.

The PIQ sensor on the wrist of a tennis player.
The PIQ sensor on the wrist of a tennis player.
Photo: PIQ

Accessories for wearing the device in various sports are sold separately.

PIQ claims it is currently working with leading brands for 21 other sports disciplines to leverage the PIQ sensor.

The sensor and relevant accessories are available now for golf ($269) and tennis ($178) with a ski kit ($198) available for pre-order. The other undisclosed sports will be announced throughout the year.