Apple’s 64-Bit A7 Caught Entire Semiconductor Industry With Its Pants Down

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After Apple released the iPhone 5s with the A7, the world’s first 64-bit chip, ARM competitor Qualcomm made quite the fool of themselves about it. First, Qualcomm representative Anand Chandrasekher called a 64-bit ARM chip a “gimmick.” Then they ate their words, soft fired Chandrasekher, and announced their own 64-bit chip to ship in 2014.

If that seems like a disorganized, chaotic response, you’re right. But there’s a reason for that. According to a new report, Apple’s unveiling of the 64-bit A7 chip took the entire semiconductor industry with their pants down… and everyone’s now scrambling to catch up.

iOS 7’s Lightning Chip Detection Has Already Been Cracked

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With iOS 7, when you plug an unauthorized Lightning cable into your iOS device, you’ll get a notification that informs you you’re not using a “certified” Lightning accessory, and that it “may not work reliably” with your device.

But after just two weeks, one accessory maker has already cracked Apple’s detection and fooled iOS 7 into thinking uncertified Lightning accessories are certified ones.

Apple’s Phil Schiller Says Chips & Scratches On Black iPhone 5 Are ‘Normal’

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Some iPhone 5s are being delivered with chips like these.
This is normal, apparently.

While the vast majority of us couldn’t be happier with our new iPhone 5s, a number of users who decided to purchase the black & slate model have noticed that its anodized aluminum finish is prone to chipping and scratching. Unfortunately, it’s not an isolated issue affecting a certain batch of black devices, either — it appears to be affecting them all.

Could this be an issue Apple quickly needs to address? No. Apparently not. According to the company’s senior vice president of worldwide marketing, Phil Schiller, those chips and scratches are “normal.”

What’s This Mysterious Chip Inside The iPhone 5 Hiding?

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Sonny Dickson got his hands on some pictures in which the “mysterious” chip shielding in the front assembly of the iPhone 5 was peeled back.

So what was underneath? The rumored, then discredited, NFC chip? A fingerprint sensor to go along with Apple’s recent, hasty acquisition of Authentec?

Nope, it’s definitely not either of those, but no one still knows for sure. The chances are, though, it’s nothing very exotic, but a required silion to make the new iPhone’s In-Cell touchscreen work.

Source: Sonny Dickson