More Macs Than They Can Count: Inside the Moscow Apple Museum [Gallery]

More Macs Than They Can Count: Inside the Moscow Apple Museum [Gallery]

Behold: The Moscow Apple Museum

At first glance, it looks as if someone’s raided a high street Apple Store, stolen all the iPhones and iPads and MacBooks Air, and dumped a load of retro computers in their place.

Look closer, and you’ll begin to understand what a remarkable achievement this place is.

Welcome to the Moscow Apple Museum, owned and operated by 46-year-old computer engineer Andrey Antonov. If ever you felt the need to explain to your kids how Apple got where it is today, this is the place to take them.

Andrey didn’t start out to build a museum. Like most of us, his passion for Apple started out as a hobby, vaguely connected to his work.

After graduating from college in 1987 with a degree in computer engineering, Andrey got a job a few years later with a company that distributed Apple’s products in Russia at the time. That was when he started to collect computers.

More Macs Than They Can Count: Inside the Moscow Apple Museum [Gallery]

How Macs used to be

“The first computer in my collection was Mac SE. It needed a lot of work to bring it into operation,” he says.

That SE sparked his interest, and from there the collection grew fast. No-one wanted this stuff. They practically gave it away.

“There was much less global attention on Apple in those days,” says Andrey. “Collecting was very inexpensive.”

Andrey has so many computers now, he’s not sure of the exact total number. The stuff in the museum isn’t even the whole collection, it’s just the highlights.

More Macs Than They Can Count: Inside the Moscow Apple Museum [Gallery]

This is what “tablet” used to mean

Andrey’s collection is doubly special because it extends far beyond computers. You name it, he’s got it. The Pippin, Apple’s short-lived venture into videogames? Yup. A working Apple II? Yup. QuickTake camera? Yup. Posters, mugs, keyrings, T-shirts? Yup, all of it. It’s an amazing collection. Luckily he had a very understanding boss, who allowed him to use some storage space at work. But eventually the collection outgrew that. Now it has premises of its own, and moved into its most recent home in August this year.

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  • djkikrome

    I have a collection of stuff but don’t see any use for any of it. And no one wants it either. A Lisa, Apple II, Apple Iic, Mac Classic, Mac SE, Imagewriter, laserwriter II, Zip Drives, etc. etc.

  • thehighesttimes

    I was born in 1992 so it’s amazing to me how much plastic was used for EVERYTHING. Still cool though man. The oldest I have is a 2002 flat panel iMac I got for my 10th birthday, still got all the original stuff for it.

  • ftpman

    I have a collection of stuff but don’t see any use for any of it. And no one wants it either. A Lisa, Apple II, Apple Iic, Mac Classic, Mac SE, Imagewriter, laserwriter II, Zip Drives, etc. etc.

    There are a lot of people still buying all things Apple II/Lisa/IIC/III etc. so age doesn’t matter. If you don’t like Ebay, BluJay is free and Applefritter is a great place to get rid of working Apple hardware and software of any vintage if you prefer person to person.

About the author

Giles TurnbullGiles Turnbull is a freelance writer in England. He also writes for the Press Association and The Morning News. You can find out more at his website, and follow him on Twitter @gilest.

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