Teenager Gets New iPhone For Christmas… Along With 18-Point Contract From Mom

Teenager Gets New iPhone For Christmas… Along With 18-Point Contract From Mom

Imagine your delight as a teenage boy who’s just unwrapped a shiny new iPhone for Christmas. It’s probably your first smartphone — maybe even your first cellphone period — and you can’t wait to turn it on and start playing with it. But before you can do that, you must sign an 18-point contract, laid out by your mom, which details the terms and conditions of your iPhone ownership.

That’s what happened to 13-year-old Gregory this Christmas. Before he claimed his new iPhone, his mother, Janell Burley Hofmann, made him agree to a number of “rules and regulations,” some of which you’ll certainly find amusing.

Here’s the contract Gregory’s mother laid out for him:

Dear Gregory

Merry Christmas!  You are now the proud owner of an iPhone.  Hot Damn!  You are a good & responsible 13 year old boy and you deserve this gift.  But with the acceptance of this present comes rules and regulations.  Please read through the following contract.  I hope that you understand it is my job to raise you into a well rounded, healthy young man that can function in the world and coexist with technology, not be ruled by it.  Failure to comply with the following list will result in termination of your iPhone ownership.

I love you madly & look forward to sharing several million text messages with you in the days to come.

1. It is my phone.  I bought it.  I pay for it.  I am loaning it to you.  Aren’t I the greatest?

2.  I will always know the password.

3.   If it rings, answer it.  It is a phone.  Say hello, use your manners.  Do not ever ignore a phone call if the screen reads “Mom” or “Dad”.  Not ever.

4.  Hand the phone to one of your parents promptly at 7:30pm every school night & every weekend night at 9:00pm.  It will be shut off for the night and turned on again at 7:30am.  If you would not make a call to someone’s land line, wherein their parents may answer first, then do not call or text.  Listen to those instincts and respect other families like we would like to be respected.

5.  It does not go to school with you.  Have a conversation with the people you text in person.  It’s a life skill.  *Half days, field trips and after school activities will require special consideration.

6.  If it falls into the toilet, smashes on the ground, or vanishes into thin air, you are responsible for the replacement costs or repairs.  Mow a lawn, babysit, stash some birthday money.  It will happen, you should be prepared.

7.  Do not use this technology to lie, fool, or deceive another human being.  Do not involve yourself in conversations that are hurtful to others.  Be a good friend first or stay the hell out of the crossfire.

8.  Do not text, email, or say anything through this device you would not say in person.

9.  Do not text, email, or say anything to someone that you would not say out loud with their parents in the room.  Censor yourself.

10.  No porn.  Search the web for information you would openly share with me.  If you have a question about anything, ask a person – preferably me or your father.

11.  Turn it off, silence it, put it away in public.  Especially in a restaurant, at the movies, or while speaking with another human being.  You are not a rude person; do not allow the iPhone to change that.

12.  Do not send or receive pictures of your private parts or anyone else’s private parts.  Don’t laugh.  Someday you will be tempted to do this despite your high intelligence.  It is risky and could ruin your teenage/college/adult life.  It is always a bad idea.  Cyberspace is vast and more powerful than you.  And it is hard to make anything of this magnitude disappear – including a bad reputation.

13.  Don’t take a zillion pictures and videos.  There is no need to document everything.  Live your experiences.  They will be stored in your memory for eternity.

14.  Leave your phone home sometimes and feel safe and secure in that decision.  It is not alive or an extension of you.  Learn to live without it.  Be bigger and more powerful than FOMO – fear of missing out.

15.  Download music that is new or classic or different than the millions of your peers that listen to the same exact stuff.  Your generation has access to music like never before in history.  Take advantage of that gift.  Expand your horizons.

16.  Play a game with words or puzzles or brain teasers every now and then.

17.  Keep your eyes up.  See the world happening around you.  Stare out a window.  Listen to the birds.  Take a walk.  Talk to a stranger.  Wonder without googling.

18.  You will mess up.  I will take away your phone.  We will sit down and talk about it.  We will start over again.  You & I, we are always learning.  I am on your team.  We are in this together.

It is my hope that you can agree to these terms.  Most of the lessons listed here do not just apply to the iPhone, but to life.  You are growing up in a fast and ever changing world.  It is exciting and enticing. Keep it simple every chance you get.  Trust your powerful mind and giant heart above any machine.  I love you.  I hope you enjoy your awesome new iPhone.  Merry Christmas!

xoxoxo

Mom

As a parent myself, I have to say there are some points here that I’d certainly agree with. Number three’s a good one, as are numbers 11 and 12. But there are a few that seem a little too controlling, such as numbers two, four, 13, and 14. They seem amusing to us now, but I know I wouldn’t be happy with those if I was Gregory.

Having said that, I probably would have signed anything to have an iPhone when I was 13. Back then my phone was a Nokia 3310, and it had no Internet, no email, no camera… it didn’t even have a color screen. Its best feature was the game Space Impact. Its battery did last for several days, though.

  • technochick

    As a parent I would think you would understand why number 2 and 4 are possible the most important ones. This is a 13 year old kid. Traverse little reason for him to have an iPhone anyway. But his parent has chosen to give him this opportunity and as a parent has a duty to guide and control it. So what if the kid doesn’t like the rules, he can do without an iPhone.

  • Robert X

    That is a pretty awesome parent. Well thought out and reasoned.

  • thegraphicmac

    As a parent I would think you would understand why number 2 and 4 are possible the most important ones.

    I agree completely. These are definitely the most important ones. My nephew (spoiled shit that he is) would never come out of his room if his parents didn’t force him to turn the TV/Playstation, laptop, and iPhone off. And knowing the password is essential for good parenting. We even went a step further in that he must “friend” anyone in the family on any social network he joins so we can keep tabs on him (we do not interfere or post on his wall, etc., but we do keep an eye on his activities.

  • shade/ohio

    awesome parent . we need plenty of those

  • chriswtburke

    As a parent, I believe it is our duty to know everything our kids are up to.. I’ve heard to many stories of parents getting bills that’s were $1000 and then they call the provider and complain that they weren’t notified of the use.. Is not the providers responsibility to tell you that you are using your phone.. That’s why they create the “my Account” apps, so you can track your usage,, I believe that if you are giving your kid a cellphone, it is your duty to know exactly how your kid is using it.. And I think it’s a parents right, and duty to know how they a using it, and its their duty to limit how they use it, because otherwise the kid is going to become a tech zombie, like many of us are today (and I say us, because I know I use tech way to much).. I don’t want my kid to have his head buried in a phone when he’s in a room full of people, I want him to socialize with those people,, I also don’t want my kid to be up all night texting or googling porn, this is why this parent is taking the kids phone away at night.. to prevent them from doing something stupid.. Kids stay up ll hours of the night texting each other, and then are tired in school the next day.. This parent is being a GOOD responsible parent, and preventing that.. I would think as a parent you would want to know why she wants to know the password,, simply so she can know what he’s doing with the phone. It’s good parenting.. Sme may think its overbearing, but, I think it’s responsible parenting. This guy isn’t 17 or 18.. He’s 13.. And yes, when ou have a phone like the iPhone, it’s far to easy to do things like send pics of your junk to girls, I’ve seem lives of high school kids ruined because of it (I’m a youth pastor, and worked in a high school, and talked to many cring girls who did just that..) this parent is just wanting to keep track of what her kid is doing…

    Ultimately I think if every parent showed HALF the concern for their kids as this parent is showing, then the world would not have so many messed up kids in it.. We’ve got some really messed up kids today.. A very messed up sense of entitlement, and this “me me me” attitude.. I bet you this kid has a good head on his shoulders… All because his parents care.. They don’t just give him what he wants, with no rules attached to it..

    I’d love for COM to follow up with these parents in 6 months and see how he’s doing with his phone…

  • StevenSaidWhat

    No kids here, but the issue seems pretty simple: parents pay for the phone, they get to dictate the terms. They’re not forcing the son to take it. I don’t think anything seems unreasonable, and the kid will likely appreciate the phone more and learn that freedom requires responsibility. Even with the contract, this kid has it better than I did. I was his age in the early 80s, and it took an act of God to get my father to add call waiting to the home line. I probably wouldn’t have had a phone at all if cells had been available then.

  • joewaylo

    If I was this sensitive to a child, I’d not get the kid an iPhone at all. Heck I’d enable restrictions and disable everything not pertinent to simply answering the telephone. Anyone under 18 do not have a budget in mind. They’ll liquidate their parents until they get their own money and have to work on their own budget.

    Plus they won’t learn until they start checking their very own account and find it liquidated due to their own expensive appetite. They need to learn that an Application or an In-App Purchase is the cost of their next soda at $2 or potato chips at $2. Heck it’s even more. You wind up spending 6 of those sodas or 6 potato chips on those app purchases.

  • TechBell

    Perhaps a bit strict but fair. The entitlement kids seem to have about what they should own, do or live has gotten a bit obnoxious. Then again, my take on an iPhone for a kid is: you want one, pay for it yourself.

  • JeromeKurliak

    As parents, we never had to be so overbearing. It had a lot to do with the fact that we weren’t so overbearing.

    We talked about, and more importantly exemplified, behaviors that make sense, and they got it. It works a lot better than this sort of verbal straight jacket. If I got one of these I’d say, “Thanks, but no thanks,” and get my own phone. And expect my kids to do the same.

    We counted on our kids to have common sense, and they did. Did they mess up occasionally? Sure. As did (and do) we, and every other human on the planet. That’s not to say that they experimented with drugs or had children out of wedlock or anything like that. They have way too much common sense for that.

    It’s all about teaching how to think instead of what to think. We taught our kids “Don’t let others do your thinking for you”–and this crosses that line egregiously.

  • chriswtburke
    As a parent I would think you would understand why number 2 and 4 are possible the most important ones.

    I agree completely. These are definitely the most important ones. My nephew (spoiled shit that he is) would never come out of his room if his parents didn’t force him to turn the TV/Playstation, laptop, and iPhone off. And knowing the password is essential for good parenting. We even went a step further in that he must “friend” anyone in the family on any social network he joins so we can keep tabs on him (we do not interfere or post on his wall, etc., but we do keep an eye on his activities.

    I have friends who said the only way their kids were allowed to join Facebook was of their parents could have the password to the accounts.. And I think it’s smart.. It keeps their kids accountable.. Prevents them from doing or saying stupid things online.. Kids these days are saying things they would never say an posting pictures of things they would never post, because their parents can’t see the page,l but this way, the parents have full access.. So it keeps the kids from doing stupid things. I love it, and will use it when my kids are old enough to be on Facebook.. (They are only 4 and 2 right now)

  • chriswtburke

    Perhaps a bit strict but fair. The entitlement kids seem to have about what they should own, do or live has gotten a bit obnoxious. Then again, my take on an iPhone for a kid is: you want one, pay for it yourself.

    I don’t think it’s strict at all.. Like the mom said.. “I paid for it, it’s mine”. But like you said, kids sense of entitlement is very obnoxious… And I don’t think kids need iPhones today.. Give them a flip phone that can text and call home.’ And that’s it.. I also think if kids phones didn’t have cameras, a lot of teen girls lives would be a lot better.. But that’s because they are so stupid..

  • chriswtburke

    If I was this sensitive to a child, I’d not get the kid an iPhone at all. Heck I’d enable restrictions and disable everything not pertinent to simply answering the telephone. Anyone under 18 do not have a budget in mind. They’ll liquidate their parents until they get their own money and have to work on their own budget.

    Plus they won’t learn until they start checking their very own account and find it liquidated due to their own expensive appetite. They need to learn that an Application or an In-App Purchase is the cost of their next soda at $2 or potato chips at $2. Heck it’s even more. You wind up spending 6 of those sodas or 6 potato chips on those app purchases.

    Like the mother says, she thinks he’s responsible enough for it, and she wants him to have it… She also wants to use it as a chance to teach him other things.. And she clearly doesn’t want him to become another one of those rude teens who sits there and texts all day and night.. I think she’s doing a great thing.. She’s giving him the responsibility.. But remember, he’s also 13.. He’s not 18… If you let a 13 keep the phone 24 hours a day, and simply tell him “no texting after 7:30″ he’s going to break your rules… So I’m guessing they are taking the phone, so that he doesn’t break the rules… It’s like putting a chocolate cake in front of a dog and saying no.. Ten leaving the room and expecting the cake to still be there.. It’s not going to happen… He’s 13.. Not 18.. He’s responsible to some regard.. But clearly not as responsible as someone who is 18 or 20 who knows that they have work or school tomorrow, so they shouldn’t be on the phone all night, texting, or playing games… She’s being a smart parent, not setting her kid up to fail..

  • gnomehole

    Too strict. Kids are growing up these days too sheltered and protected. Let them learn some of life’s lessons… just be aware of what is happening in their lives. Let em’ surf some porn and get in trouble for texting in class… its 2013, not 1982.

    Thought an iPhone as a gift is awesome. Cudos on that.

  • Taleyho

    the only one i wholeheartedly disagree with is 13. Its what a smartphone is for!
    A memory can be forgotten, but a single photo or video can last a lifetimes and recall a thousand memories with every viewing.

  • gettysburg11s

    Some parents just take things too far. If I was going to give an iPhone to a 13 year old, I’d probably lay down a few simple rules, but nothing like this. I’d trust the kid first. Of course, I’d have to disagree about giving a 13 year old an iPhone in the first place. I have two kids and neither have an iPhone. If they get a phone, it will be a texting phone with unlimited texts. Not a smart phone, not until they are maybe 16 or 17, and at that point they can work and buy it themselves.

  • Josh Yates

    This is great. Totally on the Sam page as chriswtburke. I’m a youth pastor as well and see things happening ALL the time with students and tech that really ruin reputations & lives. I think this parent is right on. It’s great to see a parent that isn’t most concerned with being their child’s best friend, but their parent. We got our eight year old daughter an iPod Touch for Christmas and have most of it locked down (no Safari, Facebook, social media, App Store, etc). She plays games and messages/face times mom, dad, grammie & grandpa. Takes picutres of her stuffed animals as well. She has a time limit each day as welll. As she gets older and shows responsibility, we’ll remove some of those restrictions. My job, as a parent, is to help my kids process the world around them and to protect them from the bad.

  • bdkennedy

    So he’s not allowed to take it to school and then has to hand it over at 7:30pm? Lame. Should have just gotten him an iPod.

  • mmoz

    as a teacher, I would like to add “your teacher has permission to take your phone and throw it out the window after they ask you to put it away three times”

  • robdel12

    There is no way I’d take this phone if I were the kid. Way too strict and the kid can’t even use it. She has to have the password for what? Why? To invade? Snoop around? I know if I were him I wouldn’t even use it.

    Controlling isn’t the way to parent. It builds no trust in him. Also, why have a phone if have to give it up at 7:30? Really? Give me an iPod then.

  • jackintosh11

    as a teacher, I would like to add “your teacher has permission to take your phone and throw it out the window after they ask you to put it away three times”

    So if you were a kid, would you want your teacher throwing your phone out the window? No, I didn’t think so. If you were the kid’s parents, would you want to pay for a new phone? You wouldn’t. If you were the parents, would you make the teacher pay for the phone and complain about it to the school? Yes, you would.
    I feel that parents have gotten too restrictive nowadays. I think that parental controls should be a paid subscription service, so that parents think “Do I really want to pay for my kid to not be able to do stuff on his phone?” Most parents would probably say no. I teach kids how to remove the parental controls from their devices. However, I feel that #2 and #15 are reasonable. I puke every time I hear Justin Bieber, and if your parents call, answer it. However, there should be a feature on the iPhone to block numbers that you don’t have to pay AT&T $5 a month for. Also, if a 13 year old signs a contract, that contract is worthless. In most states, you have to be 18 to sign a legally enforceable contract.

  • Xiu

    While she should have just bought the kid an Android phone….
    I 100% agree with this. Anybody that thinks that a parent requiring to know their 13 year old sons password for his iPhone is violating privacy or “snooping” as was mentioned in an earlier comment is an idiot. Or that wanting your kid to turn in their phone at nights is overly restrictive. Should they not give him a bed time? Or limit his access to television and movies? Or not allow certain magazines and media into their home? The kid absolutely should sign this contract, even if many of these “terms and conditions” are really just suggestions, because this is more a teaching moment about life than a “I’m going to be a mean mommy” moment.
    The kid will sign the contract, and through living by the contract will eventually receive more and more access to the phone. Obviously it’s not a legally enforceable contract, to even suggest such is just not a viable argument here, the contract exists to help this kid learn responsibility. I know a LOT of people that I grew up with who signed “contracts” with their parents for a variety of reasons. Overwhelmingly those same people ended up being very successful, doctors, dentists, lawyers… you get the idea. If “Gregory” honors this he will be better off for it in the long run.

    Kudos to the parents out there who still understand that they are PARENTS, and responsible for every bit of data this kid transmits via his iPhone, both legally and morally.

  • Brandon Dillon

    #13 is kind of shitty

    After reading #4 I would say no thanks, you keep it. I mean really, handing the phone in at 7:30? What a joke. Smother a kid, and they just might rebel one day. You have to give some room for mistakes to happen.

  • FooGle

    Thanks Mum, you have it and let me have your password so that I would know what your iphone is for!!! Pathetic!! Poor Gregory would be lack of trust!! I’d rather not giving him an iphone at his young age than give him strict restrictions! I wonder if she insists to have her husband’s password too!!!

  • SulaymanF

    Not bad, but #5 is the most likely to be broken, by both parents and child. No phone in school? Parents demand their kids bring the phone to school, for use in case of emergencies, or if they need to be picked up, etc.

  • Kingsmuse

    I know all my kids passwords.

    The first time I try to sign onto any device of my kids and can`t get past the password is the last time they have use of the device.

    This ain’t a democracy, there is no freedom and nothing’s “fair”

  • sadirbabe
    I know all my kids passwords.

    The first time I try to sign onto any device of my kids and can`t get past the password is the last time they have use of the device.

    This ain’t a democracy, there is no freedom and nothing’s “fair”

    Parents tend not to realize that children are fellow humans, not robots they can freely control. Then you start complaining about how rebellious children have become.

  • sadirbabe
    While she should have just bought the kid an Android phone….
    I 100% agree with this. Anybody that thinks that a parent requiring to know their 13 year old sons password for his iPhone is violating privacy or “snooping” as was mentioned in an earlier comment is an idiot. Or that wanting your kid to turn in their phone at nights is overly restrictive. Should they not give him a bed time? Or limit his access to television and movies? Or not allow certain magazines and media into their home? The kid absolutely should sign this contract, even if many of these “terms and conditions” are really just suggestions, because this is more a teaching moment about life than a “I’m going to be a mean mommy” moment.
    The kid will sign the contract, and through living by the contract will eventually receive more and more access to the phone. Obviously it’s not a legally enforceable contract, to even suggest such is just not a viable argument here, the contract exists to help this kid learn responsibility. I know a LOT of people that I grew up with who signed “contracts” with their parents for a variety of reasons. Overwhelmingly those same people ended up being very successful, doctors, dentists, lawyers… you get the idea. If “Gregory” honors this he will be better off for it in the long run.

    Kudos to the parents out there who still understand that they are PARENTS, and responsible for every bit of data this kid transmits via his iPhone, both legally and morally.

    A parent should raise a human, not a robot.

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  • sigboe

    I would never agree to such a contract, I come from a poor family and would have loved an iPhone as a teen. But I would have hauled my ass over part time jobs til I could afford one without such despicable terms.

    They go against privacy, and multiple of the terms are rooted in logical fallacies and contradictions. Such as lies are not black and white, memories are nay eternal, and more.

    Not used in school? What the duck? Having a camera-phone revolutionized my schooltime, I uncovered harassment, I documented school work, and more.

    Password? without having a non-disclosure agreement, or terms of her invading the phone? It might be her phone, but the content is after all the users.

    Always answer? Again privacy, what about if you have a bad day, a phone call you have to take can put additional stress on you.

    Silence or turn it of is conter intuitive to the always answer part. Puts the accepter of the contract in a lot of cross situations.

    Porn? Why should a mother have anything to do with the sexual activities of a 13 year old if he does not want that? And thats to add getting him earlier sexually active and more likely to get a girl pregnant.

    How can the mother be sure she is most fit to decide on video games? after all she surly is a hardcore gamer.

    Being forced to listen to good music, is worse than listening to that horrible noise that is pop music today.

    Again Im from a poor family, and when I got a phone (handmedown) my childhood got a lot easier, SMS was not standard at that time, but it gave my parents the possibility to figure out where I was at or me the possibility to get out of potential bad situations, and this still counts for children today even teens.

    There is to much wrong with this contract, A for effort, F for result.

    And to answer, yes I did have a part time job at 13years, and yes I could look skeptically on decisions of grown ups at that time too, my interests at that time was reading about string theory.

  • Romeyn

    As parents we are responsible for our children until they are 18. That includes their screw-ups as well. I have similar rules with my kids. When they first got their gmail accounts, I set them up to auto-forward every message they got to my account as well. After a few months of monitoring and verification of responsible use, I turned that off, but reserved the right to monitor it. I ALWAYS know the password and check it frequently. This is all done with my children being informed. There are no computers in their rooms. The computers to which they have access can be seen at any time. They know I have remote access software installed on them and can see what they’re doing any time I want even if I’m not in the room.

    They have no choice. To suggest that they should is ludicrous. Trust isn’t simply bestowed, it has to be EARNED. The more evidence I see of responsible behaviour, the less inclined I am to monitor (NOT “snoop”). That’s MY JOB as a parent! When they turn 18 then they are free to change their password and get on with their own personal, private digital existence. Until then, they are MY responsibility.

    Lastly, they have phones, but it has been made clear to them that they have them for MY convenience, not theirs! That remains true as long as I am paying for them. Period.

  • parosswsal

    I do not “owe” my kids anything beyond food, clothing, shelter, and the knowledge of how to be a productive member of society. I don’t owe them privacy and I sure as hell don’t owe them a phone. If I can use those things and others to teach them to become productive members of society then great. Otherwise save your money kids, your 18th birthday will be here before you know it.

  • Steven Quan

    I’m Chinese and I can speak for other asians when I say, “What the hell?!?” My mom would never make me sign a contract to use a phone. If you don’t think the kid is responsible enough to have it, then don’t give it to him. Maybe it’s a cultural thing, but can’t see any parent in Asia forcing their kid to follow terms like this contract. I think it’s ridiculous. Give the kid the phone if you think he can handle the responsibilities, if not then don’t give it to him. Or give him a dumb phone so he can’t look at porn on the web or play games but still stay in contact.

    This parent clearly has an agenda to push on the kid, it’s not parenting, it’s trying to press your agenda on him, force him to live life the way you want him to live life. “Have a conversation with the people you text in person. It’s a life skill” is complete BS. Kids get plenty of social interaction with fellow students and teachers. It shows me this parent is out of touch with reality.

  • eucalistya

    Being a parent doesn’t mean being a cop. If you have to know every single thing about your kids life then it means you don’t trust them. And don’t start with the then they will grow up bad thing. Me and my siblings never had strict rules about what we could or could not do and yet we are responsible and educated people. Children aren’t robots they are someone with personality and opinion wheither you like it or not. You can’t force them to became someone you like or to be perfect. The more you control them then the more rebellious they will become. And don’t say it’s a lie because I saw it happen with a girl. You can guide them and make sure they are ready to go outside and be there to help them when they, but if you raisem them thinking that they are just like you and that they will do the same mess then you are wrong. They shouldn’t atone for your ‘sins’.

  • fede

    big times with 3310!

  • the_VIIStar

    Why does a 13 year old kid need an iphone?

    The contract means she knows he’s going to abuse it. If he wants one without rules then he can pay for both it AND the monthly contract. It’s not water or food – he’s not going to die if he doesn’t have one or she knows his password if he does have one – he won’t grow up deranged either way, like the commenters here seem to think.

  • MrSarcy

    When I was 13, I didn’t have a phone. In fact, I got a pager from work when I was about 18 and my first phone when I was 22. Which, as you can imagine, was just a phone. With buttons. I read books and technical magazines, went to the library, watched German and UK TV (because there was bugger all on TV in my own country during the day), picking up some foreign languages whilst relaxing. I also read the newspaper every day. This technology in the hands of young people is a curse. No contract can help there, although this parent is clearly doing all she can to mitigate the damage.

  • pandapower63

    Jealous much?? What a bunch of whiners! “I had to ride a dinosaur to school, uphill, in the snow, we were poor, blah, blah, blah,…” I bet that kid took a look over that contract and said “This stuff is easy!!” Not, “My rights are being violated.” It is easy for a good kid. A sneaky deceiving, liar would find it restricting. Has nothing to do with growing up poor or not.

  • msc_montgomery

    Man, hats of to this mom. Well written, thoughtful, and in keeping with some great family values. I think I will just have to use this same approach one day.

  • lambaline

    actually… i’ve seen at least six 5th graders at my school with iPhones… not kidding…

  • dockstick

    A 13-year-old boy isn’t allowed to view porn on his phone!?

    Seriously, though, this is far too restrictive. If the mom doesn’t think the kid’s responsible enough to have an iPhone without being encumbered by a bunch of ridiculous rules, she shouldn’t give him the phone. It’s as simple as that.

    Life today isn’t what it was whenever the mom grew up. She’s out of touch, and I imagine that the people who agree here are similarly out of touch with modern society. Maybe it just comes with being a parent: trying to mold someone based on what YOU think is best.

    But face it: you don’t necessarily know what’s best. In fact, you’ve probably stopped considering alternatives a while ago. That’s what happens when you get old and complacent: you get stuck in your own experiences and what you “know.”

    Your kids are lucky; they haven’t been boxed-in, yet.

    Stop holding on to values and ideals just because they’re all you know, and actually think about them. It’s possible that some of them are out of place today, and your kids should be free to live unfettered by the things that are holding you back.

    Let the kid have his phone and all of the freedom that accompanies owning it — especially an iPhone! It’s the best phone in history.

About the author

Killian BellKillian Bell is a staff writer based in the U.K. He has an interest in all things tech and also covers Android over at CultofAndroid.com. You can follow him on Twitter via @killianbell.

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