Bitzer Mobile Makes Secures Data On Business iOS Devices Easier To Access

Bitzer Mobile Makes Secures Data On Business iOS Devices Easier To Access

Bitzer streamlines the process of accessing secure business data/resources on iOS devices.

One of the things that can frustrate mobile users when using an iPhone or iPad for work is needing to repeatedly enter passcodes other user account credentials like a user name and password. Often because of a mobile device’s size and virtual keyboard, this process can seem more onerous than it does while using a Mac or PC in the office.

A growing number of apps and mobile management tools are becoming available that make it relatively easy to safely store business data in an encrypted and secure container on an iPhone or iPad. Realizing that security requires verifying a user’s identity when accessing specific apps or content after the device has been unlocked. Advantages to this include significant increases in mobile data security and the ability to wipe just the business data off of a device if it is lost or stolen.

The downside is the need for mobile users to repeatedly enter credentials – a downside that one mobile developer is helping iOS users sidestep

Often mobile users need to enter their credentials more frequently than they do while using a desktop PC. The reason being that a desktop PC is typically bound to a Windows Active Directory domain. That domain uses a process known as Single Sign-On that can grant users access to a range of network resources – file shares, a corporate intranet, Exchange or other email systems, and so on – without needing to provide credentials. Once the user logs in, each service knows if the user is allowed to use it without the user needing to re-enter his or her credentials.

This week, Bitzer Mobile announced that it was incorporating Microsoft’s Single Sign-On technology into its secure mobile data solution for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone devices. That integration allows the secure container approach, which Bitzer already offers to its business and enterprise customers, to function more like a Windows PC in the office. In short, it maintains the security advantages to Bitzer’s tools but it does so in a way that avoids requiring users to repeatedly type in login credentials as they switch between apps and documents.

About the author

Ryan FaasRyan Faas is a technology journalist and consultant living in upstate New York who has written extensively about Apple, business and enterprise IT, and the mobile industry. In addition to writing for Cult of Mac, he is a contributor to Computerworld, InformIT, and Peachpit Press. In a previous existence he was a healthcare IT director as well as a systems and network administrator. Follow Ryan on Twitter and Google +

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