Analyst: HP Needs a Tablet to Offset Declining Printer Demand

Analyst: HP Needs a Tablet to Offset Declining Printer Demand

One analyst firm brings up an interesting reason why HP may want its TouchPad to succeed: tablets are reducing the need for printers and profit-rich print supplies. That’s the word from a Wall Street research company predicting tablet could shrink corporate and business printing demand by two percent to five percent in 2012.

“Printing behavior is structurally changing; we expect a reduction in enterprise and commercial printing,” according to a Morgan Stanley report on tablets. HP is one of the printing firms expected to be most affected by the move to tablet. Other printer makers facing cuts due to the influx of tablets: Lexmark and Ricoh.

Earlier this month, DisplaySearch, a division of consumer electronics researcher NPD Group, announced it expects a 200 percent increase of tablet shipments in 2011, to 55.7 million units. By 2014, the number of tablets should hit 174.2 million, or 35 percent of the overall mobile PC market.

[Business Insider, NPD]

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  • Cartridge Shop

    As you say, tablets are developing at an alarming rate and this can only be seen as a big problem for printer manufacturers. I wouldn’t be surprised to see one of the leading printer companies bring out some sort of innovative printer in order to try and increase their rapidly declining popularity.

  • Ink Cartridges

    There will always be a need for hard copies so printers will always be around. I think though that many makes and models will be culled and we will see a much leaner, focused printer market than we have now. I mean, there are so many printers it is mind boggling.

  • Rich

    I have no sympathy for HP to be honest. The amount they were charging for their ink made it gram for gram some of the most precious material on earth. The sooner tablets saturate the market and eliminate the need for most printers the better.

About the author

Ed SutherlandEd Sutherland is a veteran technology journalist who first heard of Apple when they grew on trees, Yahoo was run out of a Stanford dorm and Google was an unknown upstart. Since then, Sutherland has covered the whole technology landscape, concentrating on tracking the trends and figuring out the finances of large (and small) technology companies.

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