Microsoft: HTML5 is the Web’s Future

Microsoft: HTML5 is the Web’s Future“The Future of the Web is HTML5,” Microsoft declared. The software giant, in throwing its weight behind the Apple-approved standard, also announced its upcoming Internet Explorer 9 will not use Adobe Flash for video playback.

“Microsoft is deeply engaged in the HTML5 process with the W3C,” the Redmond, Wash.-based company announced in on its Internet Explorer blog. “HTML5 will be very important in advancing rich, interactive web applications and site design,” IE General Manager Dean Hachamovitch adds.

Although Microsoft describes HTML5’s H.264 video standard as permitting broader use of consumer video, the software maker did not completely dismiss Flash. Flash remains “an important part of delivering a good consumer experience on today’s web,” the company announced.

Microsoft’s announcement it will abandon Flash video support may have overshadowed Adobe’s release of CS5 earlier today. Apple owners comprise nearly half of CS5 sales, the Cupertino, Calif. company claims.

The comments by Microsoft come a day after Apple CEO Steve Jobs outlined his objections to the Adobe software. Thursday, Jobs said his Cupertino, Calif. company and Adobe had “grown apart” and that Apple owners still have a wealth of options without Flash.

“Flash is no longer necessary” to watch video or other multimedia, he argues in an open letter entitled “Thoughts on Flash.”

[via 9to5Mac]

  • QualityPoint Technologies Test

    HTML5 removes the need for extra, optional elements inside the actual code. HTML5 basically allows a browser to not have to rely on extra information in order to render the same content on a screen. It, by its very nature, will intuitively know what should be shown on the screen by a much smaller and concise amount of code. Hence if u learn Html5
     it will reduce the amount of time spent on a project 

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Ed SutherlandEd Sutherland is a veteran technology journalist who first heard of Apple when they grew on trees, Yahoo was run out of a Stanford dorm and Google was an unknown upstart. Since then, Sutherland has covered the whole technology landscape, concentrating on tracking the trends and figuring out the finances of large (and small) technology companies.

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