| Cult of Mac

Cult of Mac and iFixit Teardown the Original Macintosh 128k [Feature]

By

128k Mac Teardown
Cult of Mac and iFixit teardown the 128k Macintosh

It’s the 30th anniversary of the launch of the Macintosh, and we wondered at Cult of Mac what can we do to celebrate? Then we thought, let’s dissect an original Macintosh and see what made it tick! There’s nothing like destruction in the persuit of knowledge.

In full retro spirit, we asked our friends at iFixit if they would help perform a special anniversary teardown of the 128k Mac. How does our silicon hero compare to modern Macs in terms of components, assembly and ease of repair? Of course being true geeks themselves, they jumped at the chance.

There was only one problem: where to find an original 128k Mac.

Why Your Old Mac Could Be Worth Big Bucks, This Week On Our Newest CultCast

By

new-cultcast-site-promo-pic-heath.jpg

It’s our T-Day edition CultCast! This time: Jony Ive’s golden touch makes millions for charity; Apple teases underwhelming Black Friday deals; how Apple’s blacklist keeps bad press at bay; the new money in old macs; and we pitch our favorite Thanksgiving Day foods on our holiday edition Faves ’N Raves!

Have a few laughs whilst getting caught up on each week’s finest Apple stories! Download new and past episodes of The CultCast on iTunes or hit play below and let the audio enjoyment commence.

Thanks to lynda.com for sponsoring this episode. Learn at your own pace from expert-taught video tutorials at lynda.com.

Apple 1 Sold for $330k After Auction Close

By

Apple 1 Sale
Working Apple 1 from the November 2013 Breker auction.

On Saturday Cult of Mac reported that a working Apple 1 failed to sell at auction in Germany, a notable result in the growing market for vintage Apple collectibles. It turns out that result was premature: the Apple 1 did sell for €246,000 ($330,000), after bidding on the item had closed.

The Twiggy Mac Lives! The Quest To Resurrect The World’s Oldest Macintosh

By

Hello I'm a Twiggy Mac
This rare Macintosh 128K prototype with Twiggy floppy disk drive has been lovingly restored to working order.

Nearly three decades after Apple Computer introduced the Macintosh, a pair of incredibly rare Mac prototypes have been discovered and restored to working order.

The computers, known as Twiggy Macs because they used the same 5.25-inch Twiggy floppy disk drive found in Apple’s doomed Lisa, were tracked down and painstakingly brought back to life by Adam Goolevitch, a vintage Mac collector, and Gabreal Franklin, a former Apple software engineer.

“Throughout the past 15 years, I have heard stories of and researched the fabled ‘Twiggy Macintosh’ computer,” Goolevitch told Cult of Mac in an email. “It was a thing of myth and legend — like a unicorn.”

Locating these Macs was the first step, but getting them to work was the real challenge. Goolevitch and Franklin embarked on an all-out effort to resurrect these long-lost pieces of Macintosh history.

Now two Twiggy Macs have been returned to life in full working glory. They are — without a doubt — the oldest Macs in the world. With auction prices for Apple-1 computers nudging upward toward the half-million-dollar mark, these incredibly rare prototypes — which look a lot like something you might find at a garage sale — could prove priceless. Here is the story of their amazing resurrection.

The Real Reason Apple Doesn’t Want You Opening Your Mac [Comic]

By

openmac

 

Why does Apple put all kinds of weird screws on your Mac and iPhone that take an Apple Genius to unlock?

Because a little guy lives inside there doing all the work! HaaHAa! *rimshot*

Microsoft commissioned Eldon Dedini to make the comic above and a couple others back in 1985 to poke fun at the Macintosh. The comics were made for Microsoft’s marketing team, but weren’t distributed. To Microsoft’s credit, opening the original Mac was difficult as hell, and it took more tools than just a screw driver – and Apple certainly hasn’t made it any easier since then.

 

Source: Reddit

MaCool Beer Cooler Looks Like A Vintage Mac [Kickstarter]

By

10d1695d94f9c994776a29b13d3c2920_large.jpg

Scott Stefan’s Kickstarter project is an odd one, but more on that in a second. In order not to bury the lede, I am obliged to tell you what the product is right up here in the first paragraph (or “graf” as “we in the biz” call it). It’s called the MaCool, and it’s a beer cooler designed to look just like an original 1984 Mac.

This Aluminum Apple II Looks Like It Was Designed By Jony Ive Back In 1977 [Gallery]

By

Apple2

The original Apple II was a huge breakthrough for Apple when it went on sale in 1977. And even though the 8-bit computer made Steve Jobs and Woz legends, you’ve got to wonder what Apple’s first big hit would have looked like if Jony Ive got his hands all over it.

A true Jony Ive edition Apple II will probably never see the light of day, but this customized aluminum Apple II some redditor bought off eBay might be the next closest thing. It’s simple, sleek and aluminum – everything Jony loves.

Take a look:

Rare Apple I Fetches $387,750 In Christie’s Online Auction

By

appleIauction

We’ve seen a couple of vintage Apple I computers auctioned off over the past year or so, each with an astronomically huge price tag. Another rare Apple I was sold at a Christie’s online auction today but this time the auction failed to reach its expected price.

The winner of the auction purchased the Apple I with its original manual, schematics and photo of Steve Jobs and Woz for $387,750.

While pocketing nearly 400 grand off an old dusty computer sounds like a pretty nice pay-day to most, the Apple I was expected to sell for as much as $500,000 according to pre-auction estimates, though it wasn’t expected to break the $671,400 price tag a working Apple I received in May.

 

Source: CNBC

Via: TUAW

Enjoy the Timeless Appeal of Apple’s Picasso Artwork [Gallery]

By

Picasso-Artwork-Collage

The famous Macintosh Picasso logo was developed for the introduction of the original 128k Mac back in 1984. A minimalist line drawing in the style of Pablo Picasso, this whimsical graphic implied the whole of a computer in a few simple strokes. It was an icon of what was inside the box, and became as famous as the computer it represented.

The logo was designed by Tom Hughes and John Casado, art directors on the Mac development team. Originally the logo was to be a different concept called The Macintosh Spirit by artist Jean-Michel Folon, but before the release Steve Jobs changed his mind and had it replaced by the simple and colorful drawing by Hughes and Casado. It’s been beloved ever since, and the graphic style has endured across decades.