Twitter considers orange color as fake news warning

By

A Twitter posts with fake news gets a big warning sign.
Warning messages like this one could soon appear on Twitter posts with fake news.
Photo: Twitter/Cult of Mac

Twitter is looking for ways to notify its readers when posts by politicians are judged to be factually untrue. The social-networking service is considering attaching large, orange “harmfully misleading” warnings to posts that are fake news.

Instagram CEO says there’s no official iPad app because… they’re busy?

By

Instagram volume indicator
iPhone? Heck, yes. iPad? Apparently not.
Photo: Killian Bell/Cult of Mac

The iPad may be the world’s most popular tablet, but there’s no official Instagram app available for it — and Instagram CEO Adam Mosseri says it’s because the photo- and video-sharing social network is just too busy to make one.

As reported by Verge editor Chris Welch, Mosseri said that “we only have so many people, and lots to do. … It hasn’t bubbled up as the next best thing to do yet.”

Twitter now lets you add emoji reactions to direct messages

By

Twitter-emoji-reactions
Sometimes an emoji says it all.
Photo: Killian Bell/Cult of Mac

Twitter now lets you add Facebook-style emoji reactions to direct messages.

There are currently seven to choose from — one more than Facebook offers — including the familiar thumbs up, laughing face, and love heart. They help Twitter keep up with rival messaging platforms, such as iMessage.

Twitter will ‘probably never’ let you edit your tweets, CEO says

By

Twitter has changed its mind on deleting inactive user accounts (for now)
Twitter is crushing dreams in 2020.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey this week warned that Twitter will “probably never” let you edit your tweets.

Editing has long been the most-requested feature among the Twitter community. But despite making some “practical considerations,” the micro-blogging network has dashed hopes it will ever happen.

Twitter has changed its mind on deleting inactive user accounts (for now)

By

Twitter has changed its mind on deleting inactive user accounts (for now)
Twitter is rolling back its recent announcement.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Twitter’s decision to remove accounts which had been inactive for six months or more sounded good in theory. It would free up a bunch of user names and, in theory, make Twitter more transparent by showing only information (such as follower count) that reflected current active users.

In theory. Soon after Twitter revealed the new policy this week, people raised concerns about what this would mean for users who had passed away. Why does this matter? There’s a very good reason.