Ireland continues to drag its feet over Apple tax collecting

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money
The Irish debt office said it would hire managers for the job by mid-November.
Photo illustration: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

In the latest instalment of Apple’s battles with the European Union over taxes, Ireland is set to miss a deadline to hire managers to cary out the collection of its owed taxes.

The Irish debt office previously said that it would hire custodians and investment managers for the estimated $15.3 billion tax bill it was awarded by mid-November. However, Ireland — which has fought against collecting the funds from Apple — hasn’t handed out the contracts as it said it would in tender documents.

Apple responds to Paradise Papers: We’re world’s largest taxpayer

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Apple says that it pays all the tax that it owes.
Photo illustration: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple has denied that it moved some of its operations from Ireland to Jersey, one of the largest of the Channel Islands, as an offshore tax haven so as to keep hold of its low tax rate.

The company issued a statement in the wake of the “Paradise Papers” reveal, showing details about how wealthy individuals and companies move large quantities of money overseas to bypass taxes. However, Apple says that no actual operations or investments were moved from Ireland.

Tim Cook meeting with France’s President Macron

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Cook
It is likely the duo will discuss Apple's tax battles with the E.U.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Tim Cook is currently in France, where he making a variety of visits — including meeting with President Emmanuel Macron.

Cook will meet with President Macron, who assumed power in this year’s May election, later today. He has also made a number of stops, including meeting with one of Apple’s suppliers and paying his respects at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, which honors American troops who died in Europe during World War II.

Ireland could be in trouble for ignoring Apple’s giant tax bill

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Ireland has yet to claim its Cupertino windfall.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Ireland could receive an official rebuke from European Union authorities this week for failing to collect the $17.6 billion tax payment it is owed by Apple.

Apple was supposed to pay the money way back on January 3, but Ireland has continued to battle against the case — with the majority of the country saying it doesn’t want Apple’s money. As a result, the European Commission may issue a so-called “non-compliance action” against Ireland.

Trump tax plan would hit Apple’s overseas earnings

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Donald Trump speaks to supporters at an immigration policy speech at the Phoenix Convention Center in Arizona.
President Trump wants to stop companies shifting their profits to overseas tax havens.
Photo: Gage Skidmore/Flickr CC

As part of his plans for cutting business rates, President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans have proposed a new tax that could have a big impact on Silicon Valley tech giants including Apple.

The proposal — designed to stop companies from shifting their profits to overseas tax havens — calls for “rules to protect the U.S. tax base by taxing at a reduced rate and on a global basis the foreign profits of U.S. multinational corporations.”

Apple among tech giants in France and Germany’s crosshairs

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France and Germany want to cut down on tech giants' tax avoidance.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

France and Germany are looking to crack down on loopholes that allow U.S. tech companies, including Apple, to minimize their tax contributions at the expense of local rivals.

According to a new report, France will kick things off by proposing “simpler rules” for taxing tech giants. These will be revealed at a meeting with EU officials in mid-September.

Apple’s cash pile heads for $250 billion milestone

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Apple raked in the cash last quarter.
Apple raked in the cash last quarter.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Apple’s second quarterly earnings report of 2017 will likely reveal the company now has over a quarter of a trillion dollars of cash stashed in the bank.

The iPhone-maker has so much cash its reserves exceed the foreign-currency reserves of the U.K. and Canada combined. During the last quarter of 2017, Apple’s money-making machine was earning $3.6 million per hour.

Apple: Europe doesn’t understand how we make money

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Tim Cook has always insisted that Apple is no tax dodger.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple has filed a defense against its massive European Commission tax bill, arguing that it shouldn’t have to pay its $14 billion tax bill, and that the request should be either totally or partially annulled.

The argument, essentially, is a 14-point extension of Tim Cook’s previous assertion that existing tax codes are designed for an industrial, rather than a digital age.

Apple asserts that the European Commission misunderstands Apple’s business dealings, and says the reason it shouldn’t have to pay massive taxes in Ireland is because the actual profit-driving work Apple does is carried out elsewhere.

Apple is shifting its international iTunes business to Ireland

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Apple's headquarters in Cork, Ireland.
Apple's headquarters in Cork, Ireland.
Photo: Jan Zuppinger/Flickr CC

Tax guru thinks Apple’s bill from Europe could be overturned

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Apple's tax structure landed it with a massive bill last year.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Apple’s massive tax bill from the European Commission is tantamount to an ill-advised “land grab” and could be reversed in court, claims Feargal O’Rourke, the man who heads up the tax practice at PricewaterhouseCoopers in Ireland.

Speaking at the Irish Times corporation tax summit in Dublin, O’Rourke said he is confident the Commission’s decision will be overturned by the European Court of Justice.