Apple declines chance to defend EU tax case

By

money
Apple doesn't want to speak in public about its tax dispute.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple has turned down the invitation to publicly testify before the European Parliament’s special committee on tax evasion. According to the company, the reason is that it doesn’t want to risk doing anything which could harm its ongoing appeal against the massive EU tax bill it faces.

In a letter to the EU committee published today, Apple said that, “It is important to ensure public commentary does not prejudice those proceedings.”

Cupertino wants to squeeze extra taxes out of Apple

By

money
Headcount tax would charge Apple for every employee in Cupertino.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Cupertino could introduce a tax that would charge Apple an additional fee based on its number of employees. The city has hired a firm to poll residents asking their thoughts on such a tax, and how it should be spent.

At present, Apple has upwards of 25,000 employees in the Bay Area, although it’s not clear how many of these are specifically based in Cupertino. Apple is Cupertino’s largest employer, and has been for many years.

Apple starts paying off its massive $16 billion European tax bill

By

Big pile of cash underneath an Apple logo.
Apple's payment means EU will drop may drop its lawsuit against Ireland.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple has transferred the first 1.5 billion euro ($1.18 billion) installment of its $16 billion fine ordered by the European Union, reflecting back taxes the company supposedly hasn’t paid.

The payment was confirmed today by Ireland’s Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe. In response to Apple paying up, EU authorities are reportedly open to dropping a lawsuit against Ireland for failing to do more to chase Apple’s debt.

U.S. can’t help Apple in its fight against EU

By

money
U.S. government won’t be able to aid Apple in its fight against European Union.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

The U.S. wanted to be in Apple’s corner for its battle against the European Union, but a ruling from the EU’s highest court means that the United States is going to have to keep its distance.

The court upheld a previous December decision from a lower court, stating that the American government has not proved that it has any direct interest in the state aid case against Apple.

Tim Cook was ‘very helpful’ in Trump meeting at the White House

By

Donald Trump speaks to supporters at an immigration policy speech at the Phoenix Convention Center in Arizona.
Tim Cook met with President Trump earlier this week.
Photo: Gage Skidmore/Flickr CC

Apple CEO Tim Cook was reportedly “most helpful” during his White House meeting with President Donald Trump earlier this week. Cook was enthusiastic about the Trump administration’s recent tax cuts, and also had some advice about business dealings in China.

“I really enjoyed the meeting,” Larry Kudlow, director of the National Economic Council, told CNBC’s Squawk on the Street. “I spent a good amount of time with [Cook], and then we came back and we visited the POTUS.”

Apple spared from Trump’s trade war with China – for now

By

iPhone X
Trump's tariff list doesn't include smartphones and laptops.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

The iPhone and other major tech products are safe from Trump’s brewing trade war with China.

On Tuesday, the office of the U.S. Trade Representative revealed that it was slapping 25 percent tariffs on 1,300 products coming from China related to technology, transport and medical products. iPhone components were exempt from the list, but other products like magnetic hard drives and flat-panel television sets were hit hard.

Proposed E.U. laws crack down on tax-avoiding tech giants

By

money
Europe has been pushing for tech giants to pay their share.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

The European Commission wants tech giants like Apple and other “digital businesses” to pay their fair share of taxes, and it’s announced new proposals to help implement this.

As previously suggested by French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire, the proposed rules mean that companies would have to pay taxes throughout the EU, and not just in the location of the European headquarters.

European Union could charge Apple tax based on its global revenue

By

apple money
The EU is looking for a way to clamp down on tax avoidance.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple is among the tech giants which could be affected by a new European Union initiative that aims to tax tech multinationals at between 2 to 6 percent of their global revenue.

News of the massive potential tax shift was shared by French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire in a newspaper interview. Le Maire said that the total amount is likely to be “closer to 2 percent than 6 percent,” and will be announced in the coming weeks.

Apple switches tactics after U.S. tax changes

By

money
Alphabet and Google are doing the same.
Photo illustration: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple is cutting back on the purchasing of corporate bonds as it prepares to bring home overseas cash. Changes to tax laws in the United States mean Apple no longer needs to hold so much money in foreign countries. Alphabet and Oracle are also cutting back.

Apple will start paying its enormous E.U. tax bill in March

By

money
Apple was handed its massive tax bill in the middle of 2016.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple will pay its 13 billion euros ($15.5 billion) tax bill between March and September this year, Ireland’s Department of Finance Secretary General Derek Moran has told the country’s Public Accounts Committee.

The European Commission ordered the Irish government to recover the money from Apple after ruling that it received illegal state aid in Ireland. While Ireland is still appealing the decision, it must still collect the money, which will then be placed in an escrow account until the dispute is settled.