Today in Apple history: Tim Cook becomes Apple’s chief operating officer

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Cook
Tim Cook was on his way to the top spot at Apple.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

October 14: Today in Apple history October 14, 2005: Tim Cook takes the reins as Apple’s chief operating officer, continuing an upward climb through the company’s ranks that will make him CEO less than six years later.

“Tim and I have worked together for over seven years now, and I am looking forward to working even more closely with him to help Apple reach some exciting goals during the coming years,” Steve Jobs says in a statement.

Today in Apple history: Bono’s (Product) Red iPod nano fights HIV/AIDS

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The limited-edition (Product) Red iPod nano raised cash for a worthy cause.
Did you own this special edition iPod?
Photo: Wikipedia/Re-ality CC

October 13: Today in Apple history October 13, 2006: Apple launches its limited-edition iPod nano (Product) Red Special Edition music player, with 10 percent of profits going to fight AIDS in Africa.

Created in association with U2 lead singer Bono and activist/attorney Bobby Shriver, it’s the first of many Apple philanthropic products. “We’re ecstatic that Apple is giving their customers the choice to buy a red iPod nano and help women and children affected by HIV/AIDS in Africa,” Bono says in a statement.

Today in Apple history: iCloud takes our files and photos to the sky

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Steve Jobs shows iCloud to the world.
Steve Jobs called iCloud Apple's hard disk in the sky.
Photo: Apple

October 12: Today in Apple history October 12, 2011: Apple launches iCloud, a service that lets users automatically and wirelessly store content and push it to their various devices.

iCloud’s arrival marks the end of Apple’s “digital hub” strategy — and ushers in an age of inter-device communication and non-localized files.

Woz: Aspects of Steve Jobs’ personality were ‘very Trumpish’

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Donald Trump speaks to supporters at an immigration policy speech at the Phoenix Convention Center in Arizona.
Steve Jobs had one or two things in common with our current President, Steve Wozniak says.
Photo: Gage Skidmore/Flickr CC

Aspects of Steve Jobs’ personality strike former Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak as, “very Trumpish,” Woz reportedly told an audience Tuesday night at Carnegie Music Hall as part of the American Middle East Institute’s 10th Conference.

Specifically, Woz seems to have been referring to Jobs cheating Woz out of some of the money for an early project the two collaborated on at Atari, his failure to listen, and tendency to say nasty things to people.

What we love (and don’t) about the Apple TV 4K, plus our favorite minimalist iPhone 8 cases on The CultCast

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CultCast on Apple TV
The 4K Apple TV is even better than we thought.
Photo: Apple

This week on The CultCast: A company unlike any other, some say Steve Job’s greatest product was Apple itself. But how has it fared in the six years since his passing? We’ll share the cold, hard facts. Plus: What we love (and don’t) about the Apple TV 4K; an iOS 11 software trick doubles your iPhone storage; and we’ll wrap up our favorite minimalist cases for your iPhone 7, 8 and X.

Our thanks to Squarespace for supporting this episode. It’s simple to accept Apple Pay and sell your wares with your very own Squarespace.com website. Enter offer code CultCast at checkout to get 10 percent off any hosting plan.

Today in Apple history: iPhone 4s opens for Siri-ous preorders

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iPhone 4s
The iPhone 4s was the last iPhone Steve Jobs directly worked on.
Photo: Apple

October 7: Today in Apple history October 7, 2011: Two days after the death of Steve Jobs, Apple opens preorders for its next-gen iPhone 4s.

The last iPhone that Jobs worked on directly, the 4s boasts a speedier A5 chip, improved 8-megapixel camera with 1080p HD video recording, and — most significantly — Apple’s new AI virtual assistant, Siri.

How a photog captured Steve Jobs’ piercing glare

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Albert Watson's photo of Steve Jobs, right, is similar to a portrait of Jobs in his younger years.
Albert Watson's photo of Steve Jobs, right, is similar to a portrait of Jobs in his younger years.
Photo: Simon & Schuster

Put the late Steve Jobs in your mind and chances are the iconic photograph made by Scottish photographer Albert Watson comes to mind. It’s a daring glare into the lens, a hand on the chin creating a kind of pedestal for a brain that helped to usher in the age of personal computing.

Today is the sixth anniversary of Jobs passing from cancer and Watson’s story about the day in 2006 Jobs sat in front of his lens should bring a chuckle to those who still miss him or knew his mercurial nature firsthand.