Steve Jobs sculpture will make you think twice about tech

By

Steve Jobs Sebastian Errazuriz
Steve Jobs, The Prophet.
Photo: Sebastian Errazuriz

Few modern-day figures inspire art like Apple co-founder Steve Jobs. His face has been painted on canvas, tattooed on forearms, vilified on the silver screen and deified in sculpture.

Now, Jobs is the first figure in an exhibit in New York next month featuring busts and full-body statues of Silicon Valley titans by Chilean artist Sebastian Errazuriz.

Steve Jobs would never approve this toxic portrait

By

Steve Jobs art
Add cigarette ash and an ashtray to the kinds of art inspired by the late Steve Jobs.
Photo: Shin

The late Steve Jobs has inspired artists to immortalize him in bronze, on canvas, the silver screen and even the opera stage. There was even a guy who injected paint into bubble wrap to create a Jobs portrait.

But the oddest may just be a Jobs likeness made by a smoker arranging ash in an ashtray.

Latte artist serves up steaming hot cup of Steve Jobs

By

Steve Jobs appears from a swirl of milk and coffee in latte art by Kohei Matsuno.
Steve Jobs appears from a swirl of milk and coffee in latte art by Kohei Matsuno.
Photo: Kohei Matsuno/Instagram

From opera to tattoos, Apple founder Steve Jobs is a subject for artists cross many mediums – even coffee.

Kohei Matsuno, a rising star in the latte art world (yes, that is a thing), added a dollop of foam to Jobs’ legend when he created a portrait of him using espresso, milk and a fine-pointed tool made especially for the most creative baristas.

How a viral Steve Jobs tribute sparked one designer’s career

By

Grieving Apple fans took comfort in this tribute to Steve Jobs and turned it into a viral phenomena.
Grieving Apple fans took comfort in this tribute to Steve Jobs and turned it into a viral phenomena.
Illustration: Jonathan Mak Long

Cult of Mac 2.0 bugApple fans felt a deep sense of mourning in 2011 when Apple founder Steve Jobs succumbed to cancer. With the fifth anniversary of his passing approaching, Cult of Mac looks at the artistic tributes that followed.

The Tumblr bio of Hong Kong graphic artist Jonathan Mak Long reads, “I try to do good work, and the world agrees on occasions.”

The death of Steve Jobs was one such occasion. Within hours of the news, grieving Apple fans across the world took comfort in an image created by the then-teenaged college student of a silhouetted Jobs in the bite of the Apple logo.

This might be the geekiest Steve Jobs portrait ever

By

A familiar face to Apple fans made from familiar technology.
A familiar face to Apple fans made from familiar technology.
Photo: Jason Mercier

Cult of Mac 2.0 bugApple fans felt a deep sense of mourning in 2011 when Apple founder Steve Jobs succumbed to cancer. With the fifth anniversary of his passing approaching, Cult of Mac looks at the artistic tributes that followed.

Artist Jason Mercier is yet another creative person to use Apple devices — and maybe the only one to literally break them into pieces for his work.

Mercier has made a name for himself around the San Francisco Bay Area by creating mosaics with trash befitting his celebrity subjects. So when his cousin commissioned him to do a portrait of the late Apple founder, Mercier knew he had to construct it with the very products and components Jobs had a hand in creating.

Bubble wrap portrait of Steve Jobs gives new meaning to pop art

By

Bradley Hart injects paint into bubble wrap for photo-realistic portraits, like this one of Steve Jobs.
Bradley Hart injects paint into bubble wrap for photo-realistic portraits, like this one of Steve Jobs.
Photo: Deukyun Hwang/Arte Fuse

Cult of Mac 2.0 bugApple fans felt a deep sense of mourning in 2011 when Apple founder Steve Jobs succumbed to cancer. With the fifth anniversary of his passing approaching, Cult of Mac looks at the artistic tributes that followed.

From afar, the colorful portrait of a smiling Steve Jobs looks like a pixilated portrait made with an early digital camera. Get closer and those pixels take on a shape familiar to your thumb and forefinger — bubble wrap.

Jobs would appreciate Bradley Hart’s “Think Different” approach to bubble wrap as well as the hyper-focus attention Hart pays to inject each bubble with a different color of acrylic paint to form a famous face.