Florida man allegedly scammed Apple Stores out of $309,768 in products

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Apple is heading toward a $1 trillion market cap. Photo: Pierre Marcel/Flickr CC
Photo: Jürgen Ulbrich, Apfellike

Most Apple Store thieves we’ve seen prefer to go with the classic smash and grab technique, but according to federal court charges, one fraudster in Florida broke his Apple heist into 42 separate scams by using a simple but major flaw in Apple’s credit card processing system to plunder $309,768 worth of products from Apple’s retail locations.

Sorry Scammers, But You Can’t Bait And Switch iOS App Screenshots Anymore, Says Apple

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iPhone Apps

Apple announced on its developer site today that it will be locking down the images submitted along with apps once they are approved for the App Store, locking scammers out of one more tactic used to scam naive app buyers into purchasing apps that may look just like popular games (like Pokemon or Minecraft). The tactic involved submitting apps with basic images for approval to Apple, then switching them out to infringing images that look just like the popular apps.

Apple’s new policy should help cut down on scammer app sellers from deploying the bait and switch maneuver in the future, helping keep app buyers a bit safer than before.

No, Microsoft Didn’t Bring Halo 4 To iOS – This $4.99 Scam Is A Game Of Chess

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Halo-4-App-Store-scam

IntelliScreenX Scam Hits The App Store And Should Be Avoided At All Costs

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Fake.
Fake.

Is MacKeeper Really A Scam?

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mackeeper_promo
MacKeeper gets a bad rap, but what's really behind the controversy?

MacKeeper is a strange piece of software. There may be no other app as controversial in the Apple world. The application, which performs various janitorial duties on your hard drive, is loathed by a large segment of the Mac community. Check out any blog, site or forum that mentions it, and you’ll find hundreds of furious comments condemning MacKeeper and Zeobit, the company behind it. We discovered this ourselves earlier this month, when we offered a 50%-off deal on MacKeeper. Look at all those furious comments on the post.

The complaints about MacKeeper are all over the shop: It’s a virus. It holds your machine hostage until you pay up. It can’t be completely removed if you decide to delete it. Instead of speeding up your computer, it slows it down. It erases your hard drive, deletes photos, and disappears documents. There are protests about MacKeeper’s annual subscription fees. Zeobit is slammed for seedy marketing tactics. It runs pop-under ads, plants sock-puppet reviews and encourages sleazy affiliate sites, critics say.

But what’s really strange is that MacKeeper has been almost universally praised by professional reviewers. All week I’ve been checking out reviews on the Web and I can’t find a bad one.

Bargain Hunters Spend $4,700 On Potatoes, Cans Of Coke Disguised As iPhones & Laptops

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Don't buy iPhones from people in the street, because they probably aren't iPhones.
Don't buy iPhones from people in the street, because they probably aren't iPhones.

A gang of con men in Manchester, England, have managed to scam unsuspecting customers out of over £3,000 (approx. $4,700) since February by selling bottles of water, cans of Coke, and bags of potatoes which they claim to be iPhones and laptops. In some cases they are taking £1,400 (approx. $2,200) per transaction.

$4.99 iOS 5 Battery Fix Available From Cydia Is A Complete Scam

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Is this a familiar sight for your iPhone 5?
Is this a familiar sight for your iPhone 5?

While Apple has been slow to fix the battery issues plaguing its new iPhone 4S and other devices running the new iOS 5 software, it seemed the jailbreaking community had come to the rescue. A tweak that hit Cydia earlier this week claims to fix your battery life woes under iOS 5, but it wants $4.99 for the privilege.

As it turns out, the tweak does nothing; it’s just a complete scam to steal your cash.