On-the-go podcast app retooled for iPad

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Anchor app
Your podcast got even easier to produce with Anchor for iPad.
Photo: Anchor

Podcasters using the popular iOS app Anchor can now manage their shows and audio clips from a larger screen with a new Anchor app for iPad.

The iPad app features new editing tools that make trimming audio or creating a recording with multiple segments easy with the touch of a finger. The app also has split screen support, which allows users to see a web browser or Notes app on one side while building a show on the other.

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ZCast on iPhone
ZCast now supports high-definition audio recording.
Photo: ZCast

Cult of Mac Magazine: Podcasting 101, iOS beta 4 changes, Juuk’s Rainbow Apple Watch band and more!

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podcast
One thing that sets apart the amateurs from the professionals is good content, but the other is production values.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

In this week’s Cult of Mac Magazine, amateur podcaster and video-tutorial creator, Chris Ward, shares what he’s learned, along with recommendations on the hardware, software and techniques to get you started podcasting using your Mac.

We’ve got video of iOS 11 beta 4 changes, and how the flashlight mode on iPhone helped a photographer light the simulated workspace of European astronaut Paolo Nespoli. Check out the long-awaited Rainbow Apple Watch Band from Juuk, and more.  Get your free subscription to Cult of Mac Magazine from iTunes. Or read on for this week’s top stories.

Podcasting 101: What you need to get started on Mac

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Chris Ward's podcasting setup
My Podcasting setup
Photo: Chris Ward

Podcasting is undergoing a renaissance with listeners consuming on-demand shows at unprecedented levels, and creators enjoying surprising levels of success with their work. One thing that sets apart the amateurs from the professionals is good content, but the other is production values.

I have been running my own small podcast for about a year, trying different ideas and formats to see what works. While I’m an amateur podcaster, I create tutorial videos for a living and I used to be a professional musician, so I know a thing or two about sound, music, and music production. I have also been using a Mac since 1997, and have recorded audio with just about every port that Apple has released. For me, the podcast is a great outlet to cover topics I don’t get to cover in my paid writing work. And of course, like many other podcasters, I like the sound of my own voice.

Here are some of the things I’ve learned, along with recommendations on the hardware, software and techniques to get you started podcasting using your Mac.

Best List: Shure MV51 is a tough, versatile microphone for iPhone field recordings [Review]

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Shure MV51 microphone
Shure's MV51 microphone is MFi-certified and great for recording with an iPhone or iPad.
Photo: Lyle Kahney/Cult of Mac

Best List: MV51 microphone by Shure

Looking like something Elvis Presley would rock, the Shure MV51 is a handsome, retro-styled microphone well-suited to podcasting with an iPad or iPhone. Sturdy and portable, I find it great for recording on the go. It’s small enough to throw into a jacket pocket and, because it’s made of all metal, it’s nigh indestructible.

Paired with an iPhone and Shure’s well-designed recording app, it’s a lot more compact than most podcasting rigs, and versatile enough for most recording situations. Best of all, the audio it captures sounds great.

These retro Mac fans were podcasting before it was cool

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James Savage and John Leake know a thing or two about computer history, especially when it comes to Macs.
James Savage and John Leake know a thing or two about computer history, especially when it comes to Macs.
Photo: James Savage

Cult of Mac 2.0 bug When James Savage and John Leake uploaded the first episode of their RetroMacCast, they were thrilled with the number of downloads: 18.

Not exactly a meteoric start, but considering neither host ever had that many people at one time interested in hearing them talk about old Apple computers, this was a pretty big deal.

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Podcasting doesn't have to break the bank. Here  are some high quality rigs and Mac apps to get you started.
Podcasting doesn't have to break the bank. Here are some high quality rigs and Mac apps to get you started.
Photo: Ally Kazmucha/The App Factor

New app turns your iPhone into mobile podcasting studio

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Phone in your podcast (no kidding)  with the app ZCast.
Phone in your podcast (no kidding) with the app ZCast.
Photo: Zula

You don’t need a high-frequency antenna or FCC license to be a broadcaster in the 21st century. Anyone can have a podcast – well, that is, anyone with the technical know-how and money for equipment, such as a good microphone, to produce their work.

A company called Zula wants to eliminate what might be the last barrier for the DIY media star. It launched an iPhone app called ZCast, which allows users to produce an audio podcast anywhere with just an iPhone or Mac computer.

Poodle.FM, A Search Engine For Podcasts

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Screen-Shot-2013-07-25-at-12.48.31.jpg

Ever wondered which episodes of our own CultCast feature conversations about WWDC? Or which episodes of the original The Talk Show have Dan Benjamin and John Gruber discussing a Bond movie?

Then try Poodle.FM, an experimental search engine for podcasts from the folks behind the podcatcher app Instacast.